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Rockies happy to be be back at “Coors Field”

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The Rockies opened a three-game series against the Phillies in Philadelphia on Tuesday evening. Normally, that is a mundane statement. But back in April, the Denver Post accidentally used a photo of Citizens Bank Park in a feature titled, “The ultimate visitors guide to Coors Field.”

The Phillies’ Twitter account had some fun at the Post’s expense:

After a bunch of other jokes were made at their expense by the Internet, the Post apologized for the mistake. But with the Rockies coming to Philadelphia, the team’s Twitter decided to give us all a sensible chuckle, referencing April’s snafu.

Sara Grant, one of the editors for the Post, wasn’t fond of the joke:

The Rockies’ Twitter clarified that it was a harmless joke:

Teams’ social media accounts are a big part of how they market themselves to fans. At SB Nation’s Phillies blog The Good Phight, Paul Boyé recently dug into the Phillies’ approach. That may give some context as to why the Rockies’ Twitter — and others — are so big on cracking jokes and making memes.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.