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And That Happened: Monday’s Scores and Highlights

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Here are the scores. Here are the highlights:

Cubs 7, Brewers 2: Jason Heyward tied it up at two in the eighth with an RBI single to force extras and then the wheels came off for the Brewers in the 11th when Matt Albers surrendered a homer to Anthony Rizzo and was charged with four more runs after that, all coming with two outs, including a two-run double from Heyward. It was the Cubs’ seventh straight win over the Brewers and it put them in first place in the NL Central, a half game ahead. Chicago, quite quietly, has the best record in the National League.

Diamondbacks 9, Pirates 5: You can blame both Pirates pitcher Joe Musgrove and Karma for the Dbacks’ rally, which had them come back from a 5-0 deficit late. With that five-run lead, Musgrove hit Chris Ownings on purpose, in retaliation for a HBP of Josh Harrison in the top half of the inning. Musgrove owned up to it too, saying some bullcrap about how “that’s how the game is played” and how he had to “protect his teammates.” Well, he may have protected his teammate and the Play The Game The Right Way Gods may be happy, but he didn’t protect the lead. After Owings reached he moved on to second on a wild pitch and then scored on a Nick Ahmed single. An error later and there were two on, Musgrove was out of the game and Jake Lamb hit a three-run homer. In the eighth the Snakes scored two runs on wild pitches and a couple more on an RBI triple from Daniel Descalso. No, Arizona did not score all nine of those runs because of one hit-by-pitch, but if you’re dumb enough to put runners on base late in a game to protect your honor, you deserve whatever happens after that.

Red Sox 2, Orioles 0: The Orioles toss eleven innings of scoreless, four-hit ball — with Dylan Bundy shutting the Sox down for eight innings himself — but Boston loaded the bases against Mychal Givens in the 12th, got two sac flies and that was enough.  Steven Wright and five relievers tossed the goose eggs for the Sox. A win, yes, but Boston has scored only ten runs in its last five games.

Marlins 7, Giants 5J.T. Realmuto had three hits, homered and drove in two and Brian Anderson homered, doubled twice, and drove in two his own self. Madison Bumgarner didn’t have the best night of his life, giving up four runs in five and a third, blowing a 4-2 lead in his final frame, and when he was lifted for a reliever he got ejected for beefing at the home plate ump on his way off the field. “There was just a lot of borderline pitches that I didn’t get,” Bumgarner said after the game. Well, welcome to Major League Baseball, MadBum. It happens.

Rays 8, Blue Jays 4: Rookies Jake Bauers and Willy Adames each drove in two runs, with Bauers hitting his first homer in the bigs, getting on base four times and scoring three times. His homer, a two-run shot, brought the Rays back from a 4-3 hole. Ryan Yarbough, one of the Rays’ relievers who start sometimes, went six innings, which is probably the most you can expect from those guys.

Indians 4, White Sox 0: Carlos Carrasco struck out 11 over seven two-hit, shutout innings, Yan Gomes doubled in a couple and Michael Brantley hit his 11th homer of the year. The Sox were victimized, once again, but wildness from Lucas Giolito, who walked Yonder Alonso and Melky Cabrera with two outs in the fourth before giving up a bloop RBI single to Lonnie Chisenhall and then Gomes’ double. Walks will kill you, man. The Tribe has won five of six.

Cardinals 5, Padres 2: Jose Martinez and Marcell Ozuna hit two-run homers and Jedd Gyorko hit a solo shot. Martinez has five homers over his last five games and has reached safely in each of his last 11 games. Jack Flaherty pitched into the seventh inning, allowing one run on three hits.

Mariners 5, Angels 3: All eight runs in this game came on home runs, two each by Mike Trout and Nelson Cruz. Albert Pujols and Ryon Healey were the other two who went deep. The difference here, of course, was who was on base when those homers were hit. In the Angels’ case: no one, for any of ’em. In the Mariners’ case, Jean Segura and Kyle Seager were on when Cruz and Healey went deep, respectively. Jean Segura had three hits, in fact, to raise his average to .343.

UPDATE: WEEI denies it will change Red Sox broadcasts to a talk show format

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UPDATE: WEEI is pushing back on this report, denying that it is true. Finn’s source for the story was the agency posting job listings which said that, yes, WEEI was looking to do the talk show format. WEEI is now saying that the agency was merely speculating and that it will still be a traditional broadcast.

Both WEEI and Finn say they will have full reports soon, so I guess we’ll see.

9:47 AM: WEEI carries Boston Red Sox games on the radio in the northeast. For the past three seasons, Tim Neverett and Joe Castiglione have been the broadcast team. Following what was reportedly a difficult relationship with the station, Neverett has allowed his contract with WEEI to end, however, meaning that the station needs to do something else with their broadcast.

It seems that they’re going to do something radical. Chad Finn of the Boston Globe:

There were industry rumors about possible changes all season long. One, which multiple sources have said was a genuine consideration, had WEEI dropping the concept of a conventional radio baseball broadcast to make the call of the game sound more like a talk show.

That was yesterday. Just now, Finn confirmed it:

I have no idea how that will work in practice but I can’t imagine this turning out well. At all.

Hiring talk show hots to call games — adding opinion and humor and stuff while still doing a more or less straightforward broadcast — would probably be fine. It might even be fun. But this is not saying that’s what is happening. It says it’s changing it to a talk show “format.” I have no idea how that would work. A few well-done exceptions aside, there is nothing more annoying than sports talk radio. It tends to be constant, empty chatter about controversies real or imagined and overheated either way. It usually puts the host in the center of everything, forcing listeners — often willingly — to adopt his point of view. It’s almost always boorish narcissism masquerading as “analysis.”

But even if it was the former idea — talk show hosts doing a conventional broadcast — it’d still be hard to pull off given how bad so many talk show hosts are. There are a couple of sports talk hosts I like personally and I think do a good job, most are pretty bad, including the ones WEEI has historically preferred.

Which is to stay that this is bound to be awful. And that’s if they even remember to pay attention to the game. Imagine them taking a few calls while the Red Sox mount a rally, get sidetracked arguing over whether some player is “overrated” or whatever and listeners get completely lost.

My thoughts and prayers go out to Red Sox fans who listen to the games on the radio.