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Supreme Court declines to review Wrigley rooftop owners case against Cubs

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Back in 2015 a couple of the businesses which sell seats on top of the buildings just outside of Wrigley Field sued the Cubs, alleging that their ballpark renovations — including the big video board in right field — blocked views inside the park. Which, yes, the Cubs could totally do, the rooftop owners said, if it were not for an agreement between the Cubs and the rooftop owners which allegedly said they could not do.

The Cubs position on that was that, per the agreement, they could block views if it was part of a government-approved ballpark renovation or expansion, which is what has been going on at Wrigley for several years now. The devil always being in the details, the sides tried to negotiate over it, failed to reach a settlement and the lawsuit was subsequently field.

The suit did not go well for the rooftop owners. The trial court dismissed it and then the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals confirmed the dismissal. The last shot was to try to get the Supreme Court to hear it. That was always a tall order — the Supreme Court rejects most appeals without hearing — and today the matter came to an end, with the Supreme Court refusing to hear the case.

Guess the rooftop guys will have to free ride off of someone else.

Pirates suspend Keone Kela two games for contract violation

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On Monday, the Pirates announced the club suspended reliever Keone Kela two games for an unspecified contract violation. Kela will begin serving the suspension tonight.

Kela, 26, went on the injured list in early May with a right shoulder injury. He was on a rehab assignment with Triple-A Indianapolis for the last week and a half. Prior to the injury, Kela posted a 4.63 ERA with an 11/4 K/BB ratio in 11 2/3 innings.

After sitting out Monday and Tuesday, Kela can rejoin the Pirates on Wednesday in the middle of their four-game home series against the Cardinals.