Clayton Kershaw maxes out at 90 MPH in return from disabled list, will have MRI on back

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Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw returned from the 10-day disabled list to start against the Phillies at home on Thursday, having missed almost all of the month of May with left biceps tendinitis. He went five innings, giving up a lone run on four hits and a walk with five strikeouts on 62 pitches.

It was an abbreviated outing by Kershaw’s standards, as he almost always throws 90-plus pitches, but it was understandable given that it was his first start back after nearly a month off. There may be more to the story, though, and it may not be good. Kershaw’s fastball topped out at 90 MPH on Thursday. He threw 28 four-seam fastballs which averaged just over 88 MPH, below his 2018 average of 91 MPH as well as his 2017 average of 92.7 MPH.

Kershaw struck out the side in his final inning, but his pitch selection was telling: of the 11 pitches he threw, only one was a fastball. He struck Jorge Alfaro out on three consecutive sliders. He went change-up, curve, slider to Aaron Nola. To finish out the inning, he went slider, slider, curve, fastball, change-up to Cesar Hernandez.

Mike DiGiovanna of the Los Angeles Times reports that Kershaw’s back tightened up during the game. He will undergo an MRI and will not travel with the team to open a six-game road trip, three of which will be against the Rockies at Coors Field.

Back issues are nothing new for Kershaw, but it has to be concerning for the Dodgers that it’s seemingly been one health problem after another for Kershaw in recent years. And for Kershaw, one wonders if the injury woes may make him hesitate to opt out of his contract after the season. If Kershaw doesn’t opt out, he’ll be under contract with the Dodgers in 2019-20 for a combined $65 million.

Larry Walker to wear a Rockies cap on his Hall of Fame plaque

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I guess this came out the day he was elected but I missed it somehow: Larry Walker is going to have a Rockies cap on his Fall of Fame plaque.

While it was once solely the choice of the inductee, for the past couple of decades the Hall of Fame has had final say on the caps, though the request of the inductee is noted. This is done to prevent a situation in which a cap truly misrepresents history. This issue arose around the time Wade Boggs was inducted, as he reportedly had a deal with the Tampa Bay Devil Rays to pick their cap on his plaque which, to say the least, would’ve been unrepresentative.

There have been some mildly controversial picks in the past, and some guys who would seem to have a clear choice have gone with blank caps to avoid upsetting the fan base of one of his other teams, but Walker’s doesn’t seem all that controversial to me.

Walker played ten years in Colorado to six years in Montreal and two years in St. Louis. His numbers in Colorado were substantial better than in Montreal. His MVP Award, most of his Gold Gloves, most of his All-Star appearances, and all of his black ink with the exception of the NL doubles title in 1994 came with the Rockies too. Walker requested the Rockies cap, noting correctly that he “did more damage” in a Rockies uniform than anyplace else. And, of course, that damage is what got him elected to the Hall of Fame.

Still, I imagine fans of the old Expos will take at least some issue here. Those folks tend to be pretty possessive of their team’s old stars. It’s understandable, I suppose, given that they’ve not gotten any new ones in a decade or two. Add in the fact that Walker played for the 1994 Expos team onto which people love to project things both reasonable and unreasonable, and you can expect that the Expos dead-enders might feel a bit slighted.

Welp, sorry. A Rockies cap is the right choice.  And that’s Walker’s cap will feature.