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Robinson Cano slugs 100th home run for Mariners

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Just over four years ago, Robinson Cano belted a three-RBI home run off of Rangers right-hander Tanner Scheppers. The Mariners eventually lost the game by a score of 8-6, but the moment held some significance for their second baseman: It was his first home run since he inked a massive 10-year, $240 million contract with Seattle that winter.

On Sunday, Cano collected his 100th home run for the club: a two-run, 398-footer off of Josh Tomlin in the second inning of the Mariners’ series finale against the Indians. The blast capped a five-run inning, giving the Mariners an early advantage that they subsequently tried to return to the Indians in the bottom of the frame.

With 304 career homers, Cano sits 10th on the active list behind Albert Pujols (619 home runs), Miguel Cabrera (465), Adrian Beltre (463), Edwin Encarnacion (354), Jose Bautista (331), fellow Mariner Nelson Cruz (328), Curtis Granderson (322), Adrian Gonzalez (313) and Ryan Braun (307). He wasn’t the only one to go deep against the Indians on Sunday, either: Ryon Healy launched two home runs off of Tomlin and Nick Goody, while Mitch Haniger saved a solo shot for the ninth inning against Zach McAllister. The Mariners won, 10-4.

Reds, Raisel Iglesias agree to three-year contract

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The Reds announced on Wednesday that the club and pitcher Raisel Iglesias agreed to a three-year contract. Iglesias had been on a seven-year, $27 million contract signed in June 2014 and had two years with $10 million remaining. According to MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand, the new contract is worth $24.125 million, so it’s a hefty pay raise for Iglesias.

Iglesias, who turns 29 years old in January, has gotten better every season pitching out of the Reds’ bullpen. In 2018, he posted a 2.38 ERA with 30 saves and an 80/25 K/BB ratio in 72 innings. Over his four-year career, the right-hander has 64 saves with a 2.97 ERA and a 359/106 K/BB ratio in 321 2/3 innings.

Iglesias gets little fanfare pitching for the Reds, fifth-place finishers in each of his four years, but he is certainly among baseball’s better relievers. Signing him to a new three-year deal gives them some certainty at the back of the bullpen in the near future.

There was a bit of confusion regarding his previous contract, which allowed him to opt out and file for arbitration if eligible. Iglesias has three years and 154 days of service time, so his new contract essentially covers his arbitration-eligible years.