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Some on the Mets beat are upset Matt Harvey didn’t want to answer questions

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Struggling Mets pitcher Matt Harvey was recently moved from the rotation to the bullpen and his 2018 debut as a reliever did not go well on Tuesday. The embattled right-hander now owns a 5.87 ERA on the season. As MLB.com’s Anthony DiComo noted, Harvey did not speak to reporters after Tuesday’s game.

Harvey also refused to speak to reporters on Wednesday before the Mets’ game in St. Louis against the Cardinals:

Sports reporters don’t like it when players don’t want to answer questions because it makes their jobs slightly more difficult. Unfortunately, some of these writers take their annoyance out on the player. Here’s how DiComo responded to a reader:

If he’s having a bad day, for whatever reason, he’s allowed to set his own boundaries and pass up speaking to reporters or simply offer a brief “no comment.” Even DiComo admits that if Harvey were to fake his way through an interview (“spout a few cliches”), he wouldn’t get any truly useful quotes or information. A player forced to interact with the media might also handle it the way Marshawn Lynch did on Media Day ahead of Super Bowl XLIX, repeatedly saying, “I’m just here so I don’t get fined,” rather than offer any valuable insight. Respecting Harvey’s wishes, rather than pestering him for a useless quote, might yield better quotes later on. This is a two-way street. Harvey was/is hostile, but so too is DiComo and anyone else who feels he’s owed an interview.

DiComo also wrote this to a reader:

If Harvey is able to turn things around, his prospective suitors won’t care whether or not he talked to reporters on April 24-25. No one will view him as “unprofessional” if he can be effective with his mid-90’s fastball. Sports journalists created the “unprofessional” angle to pressure athletes into talking to them. This can be undone as easily as it was created.

Harvey absolutely should not have been rude to DiComo and anyone else looking to talk to him as part of their job responsibilities. Keep in mind, however, that when people repeatedly refuse to respect your boundaries, you have to get more emphatic until you’re heard. The ultimate solution here is to simply be more understanding of athletes — and people in general — who are going through a rough patch and don’t want to be around/talk to people. We’ve all had plenty of days like that.

Octavio Dotel, Luis Castillo arrested in drug, money laundering investigation

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Five years ago, Octavio Dotel retired following a 15-year career in which he pitched for a then-record 13 different teams. I’m not exactly sure what he’s been up to since then, but I know that today he got arrested, as did former Marlins, Twins and Mets second baseman Luis Castillo.

That’s the report from Héctor Gómez, and from the Dominican Today, each of whom report that the two ex-big leaguers were arrested today in connection with a longstanding money laundering and/or drug investigation focused on one César Peralta. also known as “César the Abuser.” So he sounds fun. Gómez characterizes it as a money laundering thing. Reporter Dionisio Soldevila characterizes it as “drug trafficking charges.” Such charges often go hand-in-hand, of course. I’m sure more details will be come out eventually. For now we have the report of their arrests. According to the Dominican Today, four cars belonging to Dotel were confiscated as well.

Dotel didn’t debut until he was 25, and for his first couple of years with the Mets and Astros he struggled to establish himself as a starter. He was switched full-time to the Houston bullpen at 27, however, and went on to make 724 relief appearances with a 3.32 ERA and a .207 opponents’ batting average while racking up 955 strikeouts in 760 innings. At the time of his retirement his career strikeout rate — 10.8 per nine innings — was the best in the history of baseball for right-handed pitchers with at least 900 innings, edging out Kerry Wood and Pedro Martinez.

Castillo also played 15 seasons, with a career line of .290/.368/.351. He was a three-time All Star and won three Gold Glove awards.