Getty Images

Video: Cubs overcome deficit against Braves with a nine-run rally

5 Comments

How many runs does a team need to score before they’ve safely secured the lead? Five? Eight? Ten? The Braves stockpiled an impressive 10 runs in the first four innings of Saturday’s contest against the Cubs, helped to an enormous degree by Ozzie Albies‘ four-RBI performance (solo home run in the first, RBI double in the second, productive out in the third and RBI single in the fourth) and a five-run explosion in the third.

That still wasn’t enough to keep the Cubs at bay. They grabbed a handful of runs off of Sean Newcomb — a first-inning blast from Albert Almora Jr., a run-scoring groundout in the third, a bases-loaded walk in the sixth, a pair of runs in the seventh — but nothing they did hinted at the carnage that would follow in the eighth inning.

Luke Jackson hit Jason Heyward to open the eighth, then recovered to whiff Kyle Schwarber for the first out. After Tommy La Stella muscled a single into center field, however, Jackson was pulled for Jose Ramirez. Ramirez was similarly effective; he induced a swinging strikeout from Efren Navarro before also losing his grip on the ball. Kris Bryant was plunked to load the bases, Willson Contreras singled in a run, and Ben Zobrist walked in another.

With two outs and a three-run lead, the Braves still had a chance to exit the inning without any additional damage. That chance slipped away in the next at-bat: Javier Baez worked a full count, then doubled into center to plate Bryant, Contreras and Zobrist and tie the game.

The next four batters took a walk: Ramirez intentionally walked Addison Russell before he was replaced with Sam Freeman, who saw just two of 14 pitches land anywhere close to the strike zone as Heyward, Schwarber and La Stella each took a free pass (and a couple of RBI as well). Peter Moylan quickly relieved Freeman, but even he couldn’t harness whatever strange magic the Cubs were brewing. He lobbed a wild pitch at Navarro, which glanced off of Kurt Suzuki‘s glove and gave Heyward enough room to score the penultimate run. Suzuki was then charged with an error after overthrowing second base, allowing the ball to roll into center field as Schwarber plated the ninth and final run of the inning. (In other words, just your run-of-the-mill two-hit, five-walk, nine-run comeback.)

By the time the dust settled, the Braves had expended four pitchers, 55 pitches and nine runs on three hits and five walks… in the eighth inning alone. With the series now split 1-1 following Friday’s shutout and Saturday’s blowout, the clubs will face off for the deciding game on Sunday at 2:20 PM ET.

Video: Kurt Suzuki breaks World Series Game 2 tie with long solo homer

Bob Levey/Getty Images
Leave a comment

The postseason has a knack for finding unlikely heroes. Nationals catcher Kurt Suzuki was 1-for-23 in the postseason entering Wednesday’s Game 2 of the World Series. The Nats and Astros each plated two runs in the first inning, then went otherwise scoreless through the sixth inning. In the top of the seventh, with Justin Verlander returning to the mound, Suzuki demolished a high, 1-0 fastball just below the train tracks in left field at Minute Maid Park, breaking the 2-2 tie.

Verlander proceeded to walk Victor Robles, prompting manager A.J. Hinch to take his veteran starter out of the game. Ryan Pressly came in to attempt to keep it a one-run game.

The underdog Nationals held on to defeat the Astros 5-4 in Game 1. Another victory by the Nats in Game 2 would put the Astros — heavy favorites according to oddsmakers — in a big hole.

Update: Pressly walked the first batter he faced, Trea Turner. Adam Eaton successfully sacrifice bunted both runners over. After Anthony Rendon flied out to shallow center field, Hinch decided to issue his team’s first intentional walk of the entire year to Juan Soto, loading the bases. Howie Kendrick then hit what appeared to be an inning-ending ground out, but Alex Bregman booted the ball as he moved to his left. Turner scored to make it 4-2. The floodgates opened when Asdrúbal Cabrera lined a single to center field, bringing home two more runs to pad the lead to 6-2. While pitching to Ryan Zimmerman, Pressly uncorked a wild pitch to allow the two base runners to advance. Zimmerman followed up with a slow roller down the third base line which Bregman barehanded and proceeded to throw away. Two more runs scored. 8-2. Yiiiikes, Astros.