Oakland Athletics

Athletics considering using an aerial tram to get people to their hypothetical new ballpark

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One of the sites the Oakland Athletics are considering for their new ballpark that, I imagine anyway, will one day be built, is the Howard Terminal site near Jack London Square. It’s a site the city has been pushing, though the current Coliseum site is also in the mix.

As those most familiar with the ballpark situation in Oakland have noted, the biggest problem with the Howard Terminal site is access. The nearest BART station is not super close — it’s like a mile away — and there is a freeway and train tracks in between. To wit:

 

One possible solution is building a new BART station, but that’s totally not happening because of the expense. Another solution is far more . . . novel. From the San Francisco Chronicle:

The Oakland A’s are exploring using a gondola ski lift to transport fans from downtown to the Port of Oakland’s Howard Terminal, where the team is thinking of building a new ballpark . . . an overhead lift that would sail over I-880 and the Southern Pacific railroad tracks that separate downtown from the port.

Teams are always looking for uniqueness when it comes to a new ballpark, and say what you want about a gondola, but it’d certainly be unique.

The article talks about the pros and cons of such a beast and gives examples of other places where gondolas like that are used, though none are pro sports facilities. The article says 4,000-5,000 people could make the trip to the park each hour. If you’re expecting 30,000 people to go to an A’s game and if gates open a couple of hours before the game that’s gonna make things tight. I presume, though, that there will be some parking closer to the park, albeit expensive and/or a bit tricky to get to, and probably some shuttles and the like. As with all parking and transportation systems, we’re talking about “ands” not “ors.”

Still, it’s a bit out there. Certainly a change for A’s fans who, at present, are used to being able to take BART right to game, alighting at the station on the stadium’s premises. Which remains the current top selling point for the Coliseum.

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.