Christian Yelich
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Brewers place Christian Yelich on 10-day disabled list with a right oblique strain

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The Brewers have placed outfielder Christian Yelich on the 10-day disabled list with a right oblique strain, per a team announcement on Sunday. Yelich sustained the injury during the club’s 6-0 loss to the Cardinals last Wednesday and had been trying to work his way back to the lineup without first undergoing a stint on the DL. It’s unclear how long he’ll be out of commission, though if all goes well, he’ll be eligible to return by the end of the Brewers’ road trip next week.

Prior to the incident, the 26-year-old outfielder was off to a hot start with his new team. He slashed a cool .385/.407/.577 over his first 27 plate appearances and swatted his first home run of the year — a ninth-inning, game-tying, 415-foot shot — in a 5-4 win over the Cardinals last Tuesday. Granted, spring numbers mean very little, but Yelich has a solid track record to back him up: in 2017, he batted .282/.369/.439 with 18 home runs, 16 stolen bases and an .807 OPS in 695 PA for the Marlins.

While Yelich has battled a variety of hamstring and calf issues over the last year or so, he hasn’t missed any significant time on the disabled list to date and isn’t expected to require a lengthy rehab process this time around. According to comments made by club manager Craig Counsell, the MRI on Yelich’s oblique came back clean, though the Brewers aren’t anxious to rush their star outfielder back to a full-time role until he’s made a complete recovery. In the meantime, Domingo Santana is expected to cover Yelich’s post, with utility infielder/outfielder/one-time pitcher Hernan Perez and Eric Sogard positioned as backups.

Major League Baseball to launch an elite league for high schoolers

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This morning Major League Baseball announced a new elite league for high school baseball players who are likely to be drafted. It’s called the Prospect Development Pipeline League. It’ll start next summer and it’ll invite 80 of the best current high school juniors to play in a league in Florida from June through early July, culminating in an All-Star Game during MLB’s All-Star week.

The idea behind the league: to combat the current system in which a couple of pay-to-play, for-profit showcase leagues dominate the pre-draft season. Major League Baseball, schools and a lot of players’ parents have criticized this system because it favors rich kids who can afford to play in them. Major League Baseball is also likely quite keen on having greater control over the training, health and physical monitoring of prospects.

As Jeff Passan notes in his report about this, there will be a component of the program which involves live data-tracking of players during games and drills. Major League Baseball has become increasingly interested in such things but is limited in how much it can do in this regard due to labor agreements. There is no such impediment with high schoolers. Your mileage will vary when it comes to how you feel about that, I presume.