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Billy McKinney placed on 10-day disabled list with shoulder sprain

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UPDATE, 6:59 PM ET: The Yankees placed McKinney on the 10-day disabled list and recalled Miguel Andujar to claim his roster spot.

Disaster struck in the first inning of Saturday’s contest between the Yankees and Blue Jays. Yankees left fielder fielder Billy McKinney, newly recalled from Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre to cover for an injured Aaron Hicks, tracked a Josh Donaldson fly ball to left-center field and jammed his left shoulder into the fence at full force. He exited the field with trainers shortly after the crash and was later diagnosed with a left shoulder AC sprain.

Per Bryan Hoch of MLB.com, McKinney was seen by an orthopedist in Toronto and his X-rays returned negative. That doesn’t mean he’s out of the woods quite yet, though. The team has yet to disclose the severity of his injury or his projected timetable for a return to the field.

Right now, their biggest concern will be filling another void in the outfield. Hoch points out that there are no more reserve outfielders lingering on the 40-man roster and, with Jacoby Ellsbury sidelined on the 10-day disabled list until April 5 — and Aaron Hicks and Clint Frazier out even longer — they’ll need to continue thinking outside the box to fill the holes in the roster. Ronald Torreyes, Tyler Wade and Tyler Austin all seem to be potential emergency outfield candidates for the time being, with Brandon Drury as a distant fourth.

Report: Mets sign Brad Brach to one-year, $850,000 contract

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The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal reports that the Mets and free agent reliever Brad Brach have agreed on a one-year deal worth $850,000. The contract includes a player option for the 2021 season with a base salary of $1.25 million and additional performance incentives.

Brach, 33, signed as a free agent with the Cubs this past February. After posting an ugly 6.13 ERA over 39 2/3 innings, the Cubs released him in early August. The Mets picked him up shortly thereafter. Brach’s performance improved, limiting opposing hitters to six runs on 15 hits and three walks with 15 strikeouts in 14 2/3 innings through the end of the season.

While Brach will add some much-needed depth to the Mets’ bullpen, his walk rate has been going in the wrong direction for the last three seasons. It went from eight percent in 2016 to 9.5, 9.7, and 12.8 percent from 2017-19. Needless to say the Mets are hoping that trend starts heading in the other direction next season.