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Twins release Anibal Sanchez

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The Twins have released right-hander Anibal Sanchez, according to a report from Phil Miller of the Star Tribune. The move is intended to clear roster space for Lance Lynn, who was acquired on a one-year, $12 million deal on Saturday. Sanchez signed with the club on a one-year, $2.5 million deal of his own last month, but the contract was not fully guaranteed. He’ll receive $417,000 after spending three weeks in camp with the Twins.

Sanchez, 34, was on the cusp of his first season with the team after finishing up a six-year campaign with the Tigers. In 2017, he produced his worst numbers during that span, going 3-7 in 17 starts and turning in a 6.41 ERA, 2.5 BB/9 and 8.9 SO/9 in 105 1/3 innings. It came as little surprise when the Tigers declined his $16 million option at the end of the year, choosing instead to fork over the $5 million buyout as Sanchez entered free agency.

While it originally looked like the veteran righty stood a decent chance of earning a spot in the Twins’ rotation, the recent acquisitions of Lance Lynn and Jake Odorizzi forced him out of the running for a starting role. At least, that’s the reason general manager Thad Levine gave Sunday, insisting that Sanchez’s release had more to do with the new starters the club acquired over the last month and not with any facet of his performance in camp. Sanchez was originally scheduled to start the Twins’ Grapefruit League game against the Rays on Sunday. He’s 0-1 in two appearances this spring with five hits, six runs and five strikeouts scattered over four innings.

Red Sox employees “livid” over team pay cut plan

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Even Drellich of The Athletic reports that the Boston Red Sox are cutting the pay of team employees. Those cuts, which began to be communicated last night, apply to all employees making $50,000 or more. They are tiered cuts, with people making $50-99,000 seeing salary cut by 20%, those making $100k-$499,000 seeing $25% cuts and those making $500,000 or more getting 30% cuts.

Drellich reported that a Red Sox employee told him that “people are livid” over the fact that those making $100K are being treated the same way as those making $500K. And, yes, that does seem to be a pretty wide spread for similar pay cuts. One would think that a team with as many analytically-oriented people on staff could perhaps break things down a bit more granularly.

Notable in all of this that the same folks who own the Red Sox — Fenway Sports Group — own Liverpool FC of the English Premier League, and that just last month Liverpool’s pay cut/employee furlough policies proved so unpopular that they led to a backlash and a subsequent reversal by the club. That came after intense criticism from Liverpool fan groups and local politicians. Sox owner John Henry must be confident that no such backlash will happen in Boston.

As we noted yesterday, The Kansas City Royals, who are not as financially successful as the Boston Red Sox, have not furloughed employees or cut pay as a result of baseball’s shutdown in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Perhaps someone in Boston could call the Royals and ask them how they managed that.