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The Rays may do something really weird with their rotation

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Rays manager Kevin Cash told the Tampa Bay Times this morning that the team may do something unconventional with its rotation. Specifically:

This is . . . weird.

The Rays have a lot of days off early in the season such that starting things off with a four-man rotation makes sense. Indeed, Kevin Cash said, in fact, that they would do that, pushing Matt Andriese, who started 17 games last year, into long relief for the first six weeks or so of the season.

Going with a four-man all year seems weird, though. After all, even with the trade of Jake Odorizzi and the injury to prospect Brent Honeywell, the Rays still have five good starters in Chris ArcherNate Eovaldi, Blake Snell, Jake Faria and Andriese. Sure, maybe Eovaldi, coming back from Tommy John surgery — his second TJ surgery, by the way — is a question mark, but he was sharp in his first two spring training outings and says he feels strong.

The larger question is what happens on Day 5 from May-forward and what happens to the bullpen on Days 1 through 4 as a result.

“Bullpenning” got a lot of press in the postseason, but the idea that a bullpen can stay fresh with such a high-level of use for 5-6 months with few days off is a questionable one. That’s especially the case when three of the Rays’ projected starters — Eovaldi, Faria and Snell — pitched limited innings last year and can’t be expected to go six or seven innings per start in 2018 (who can anymore?). Maybe Archer is a horse, but the rest of your games you’re going to need three relievers to finish things up based on how life works these days. Maybe more. In light of that, is the bullpen going to be able to handle nine innings once every five days? Color me dubious. I think they’ll be fried by July.

In other news, Andriese will be eligible for arbitration for the first time next offseason and will come much cheaper for the Rays if his platform year is spent in long relief than as a starter, but I suppose that’s just a coincidence.

Japanese Baseball to begin June 19

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Japanese League commissioner Atsushi Saito announced that Japan’s professional baseball season will open on June 19. Teams can being practice games on June 2. There will be no fans. Indeed, the league has not yet even begun to seriously discuss a plan for fans to begin attending games, though that may happen eventually.

The season will begin three months after its originally scheduled opening day of March 20. It will be 120 games long. Teams in each six-team league — the Central League and Pacific League — will play 24 games against each league opponent. There will be no interleague play and no all-star game.

The announcement came in the wake of a national state of emergency being lifted for both Tokyo and the island of Hokkaido. The rest of the country emerged from the state of emergency earlier this month. This will allow the Japanese leagues to follow leagues in South Korea and Taiwan which have been playing for several weeks.

In the United States, Major League Baseball is hoping to resume spring training in mid June before launching a shortened regular season in early July. That plan is contingent on the league and the players’ union coming to an agreement on both financial arrangements and safety protocols for a 2020 season. Negotiations on both are ongoing. Major League Baseball will, reportedly, make a formal proposal about player compensation tomorrow.