Getty Images

Report: Rockies still interested in Mark Reynolds

1 Comment

The Rockies are still pursuing free agent first baseman Mark Reynolds, per a report from Jon Morosi of MLB Network. The two have been linked since the start of the offseason, but don’t appear any closer to reaching an agreement as the club enters its final month of spring training.

Reynolds, 34, has already enjoyed two productive seasons with the Rockies in 2016 and 2017. He was inked to a minor league deal in advance of the 2017 season, then went on to slash .267/.352/.487 with 30 home runs and an .839 OPS in 593 plate appearances — numbers he hadn’t come close to putting up since his peak years with the Diamondbacks and Orioles from 2009-2011.

Before this offseason’s unusual stalemate, it looked like Reynolds was holding out for guaranteed money in 2018, a luxury he may no longer be able to afford as Opening Day draws near. On the other hand, there’s no question the Rockies could benefit from a proven veteran presence at first base, especially as they move toward the 2018 season with 23-year-old rookie Ryan McMahon as their only viable full-time candidate. At this point, it may just be a matter of seeing who blinks first.

Report: Mets sign Brad Brach to one-year, $850,000 contract

Bryan Woolston/Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal reports that the Mets and free agent reliever Brad Brach have agreed on a one-year deal worth $850,000. The contract includes a player option for the 2021 season with a base salary of $1.25 million and additional performance incentives.

Brach, 33, signed as a free agent with the Cubs this past February. After posting an ugly 6.13 ERA over 39 2/3 innings, the Cubs released him in early August. The Mets picked him up shortly thereafter. Brach’s performance improved, limiting opposing hitters to six runs on 15 hits and three walks with 15 strikeouts in 14 2/3 innings through the end of the season.

While Brach will add some much-needed depth to the Mets’ bullpen, his walk rate has been going in the wrong direction for the last three seasons. It went from eight percent in 2016 to 9.5, 9.7, and 12.8 percent from 2017-19. Needless to say the Mets are hoping that trend starts heading in the other direction next season.