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Amed Rosario leaves game with left knee irritation

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Mets shortstop Amed Rosario lasted just two innings during Saturday’s Grapefruit League contest against the Marlins. He made a hasty exit after feeling pain in his left knee, which he told reporters was triggered after sprinting to home plate in the second inning. There’s no word yet on how long he’ll be sidelined, but he could undergo an MRI on Sunday if the pain hasn’t subsided by then.

This is a crucial period for the 22-year-old shortstop, who still has a lot to prove following his underwhelming debut with the club last August. The former top prospect struggled with consistency, both at the plate and on the field, and his strikeout-prone approach fed into a .248/.271/.394 batting line with four home runs and seven stolen bases in 170 plate appearances with the Mets last year. While he’s already locked down another starting role for 2018, it remains to be seen whether he can make the necessary adjustments to be productive in the majors.

Rosario wasn’t the only Mets player with a health scare on Saturday — Noah Syndergaard took a Justin Bour comebacker off of his thigh in the first inning, though it was later revealed that the ball deflected off of his glove and made no impact or injury.

Japanese Baseball to begin June 19

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Japanese League commissioner Atsushi Saito announced that Japan’s professional baseball season will open on June 19. Teams can being practice games on June 2. There will be no fans. Indeed, the league has not yet even begun to seriously discuss a plan for fans to begin attending games, though that may happen eventually.

The season will begin three months after its originally scheduled opening day of March 20. It will be 120 games long. Teams in each six-team league — the Central League and Pacific League — will play 24 games against each league opponent. There will be no interleague play and no all-star game.

The announcement came in the wake of a national state of emergency being lifted for both Tokyo and the island of Hokkaido. The rest of the country emerged from the state of emergency earlier this month. This will allow the Japanese leagues to follow leagues in South Korea and Taiwan which have been playing for several weeks.

In the United States, Major League Baseball is hoping to resume spring training in mid June before launching a shortened regular season in early July. That plan is contingent on the league and the players’ union coming to an agreement on both financial arrangements and safety protocols for a 2020 season. Negotiations on both are ongoing. Major League Baseball will, reportedly, make a formal proposal about player compensation tomorrow.