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Eric Hosmer gave coach Glenn Hoffman a Rolex for number 30.

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Eric Hosmer wore number 35 for his entire tenure with the Kansas City Royals. He can’t wear number 35 in San Diego, though, because it’s retired in honor of 1976 Cy Young Award winner Randy Jones. In light of that, he decided to wear number 30 in honor of his late teammate, Yordano Ventura. The problem: Padres coach Glenn Hoffman wears number 30. Problem solved, reports Jerry Crasnick of ESPN:

Hosmer was grateful when Padres third base coach Glenn Hoffman gave up his No. 30 uniform jersey as a sign of goodwill at the start of spring training, so he recently surprised Hoffman with a Rolex watch at the Padres’ complex in Peoria.

A nice gesture to all involved, really. Hosmer for honoring Ventura, Hoffman for giving up 30 without the promise of compensation and Hosmer for compensating him regardless.

I’ve always been fascinated by negotiations over numbers and the price they bring. Josh Reddick gave up his number in Oakland to Billy Butler for an X-box, which has always seemed a bit light to me. Several years ago John Lackey gave Pat Neshek an autographed Babe Ruth ball for a number when he was traded to the Cardinals. A.J. Burnett once started a college fund for Daniel McCutchen’s kid in exchange for a number. Watches — often Rolexes like the one Hosmer gave up — are pretty standard: Julio Borbon once gave Adrian Beltre his number for an expensive watch. Hall of Fame inductee Jim Thome gave Alexi Casilla a Rolex.

My favorite number deal(s) of all time occurred in the NFL, where Giants punter Jeff Feagles made out by selling his number twice. First Feagles got Eli Manning to send his family on a vacation to Florida in order to give up the number 10 Manning would make famous. Feagles took number 17. Then he got Plaxico Burress to pay for an outdoor kitchen at his vacation home in Arizona in exchange for that number 17. Dude was shrewd. According to his Wikipedia page he’s a commercial real estate agent for Keller Williams these days. Enter negotiations with him with caution, my friends.

Buster Posey has opted out of the season

Buster Posey has opted out
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Buster Posey has opted out of the 2020 MLB season. The San Francisco Giants have issued a statement saying that they “fully support Buster’s decision. Buster is an integral part of our team and will be sorely missed, but we look forward to having him back in 2021.”

Posey and his wife are adopting identical twin girls who were born prematurely and who are currently in the NICU and will be for some time. They are stable, but obviously theirs is not a situation that would be amenable to the demands of a baseball season as it’s currently structured.

Poset had missed all of the Giants’ workouts so far, Recently he said, “I think there’s still some reservation on my end as well. I think I want to see kind of how things progress here over the next couple of weeks. I think it would be a little bit maybe naive or silly not to gauge what’s going on around you, not only around you here but paying attention to what’s happening in the country and different parts of the country.” He said that he talked about playing with his wife quite a great deal but, really, this seems like a no-brainer decision on his part.

In opting out Posey is foregoing the 60-game proration of his $21.4 million salary. He is under contract for one more year at $21.4 million as well. The Giants can pick up his 2022 club option for $22 million or buy him out for $3 million.

A veteran of 11 seasons, Posey has earned about $124 million to date. Which seems to be the common denominator with players who have opted out thus far. With the exception of Joe Ross and Héctor Noesí, the players to have opted out thus far have earned well above $10 million during their careers. Players that aren’t considered “high risk” and elect not to play do not get paid and do not receive service time.