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Trevor Bauer, Collin McHugh win arbitration cases

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In addition to Jake Odorizzi winning his arbitration case today, add Cleveland’s Trevor Bauer and Houston’s Collin McHugh to the winners’ column in this year’s arbitration derby. In addition to Marcus Stroman, add Minnesota’s Kyle Gibson to the losers’ column.

Bauer will get a raise from $3.55 million to $6,525,000. The Indians offered $5.3 million. Bauer was 17-9 with a 4.19 ERA in 31 starts and one relief appearance last season, when he made $3.55 million.

McHugh beat the Astros for the second straight year and will make $5 million. The Astros offered $4.55 million. Last year he made $3.85 million. McHugh went 5-2 with a 3.55 ERA in 12 starts last season, spending a lot of time on the disabled list with shoulder problems. McHugh heads to spring training projected as the Astros’ sixth starter, behind Justin Verlander, Dallas Keuchel, Gerrit Cole, Lance McCullers Jr. and Charlie Morton. He’s obviously a trade candidate.

Gibson, who made $2.9 million last year, will get $4.2 million. He had asked for $4.55 million. Last year he went 12-10 with a 5.07 ERA, making $2.9 million.

So far players are 11-8 against the teams. There are three more hearings scheduled: Reds infielder Scooter Gennett, Royals pitcher Brandon Maurer and Marlins pitcher Dan Straily. The 22 hearings this offseason are the most since 1990, when there were 24 hearings.

Scott Boras to pay salaries of released minor league clients

Scott Boras
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Across the league, scores of minor leaguers have been released in recent days. Already overworked and underpaid, these players are now left without any kind of reliable income during a pandemic, and during a time of civil unrest.

Jon Heyman reports that agent Scott Boras will pay the salaries of his minor league clients who were among those released. It’s a great and much-needed gesture. Boras described the releases as “completely unanticipated.”

Boras, of course, is perhaps the most successful sports agent of all time, so he and his company can afford to do this. That being said, it should be incumbent on the players’ teams — not their agents or their teammates — to take care of them in a time of crisis. Boras is, effectively, subsidizing the billionaire owners’ thriftiness.