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Derek Dietrich will start in left for Marlins

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After dealing Giancarlo Stanton, Marcell Ozuna and Christian Yelich this offseason, the Marlins’ outfield situation is up in the air as they gear up for the 2018 season. Club manager Don Mattingly said Saturday that veteran infielder/outfielder Derek Dietrich is “penciled in” as the starting left fielder, though no other decisions regarding the outfield appear to have been made yet.

Dietrich, 28, agreed to a one-year, $2.9 million deal to avoid arbitration with the Marlins last month. This will be his sixth consecutive season with the club, and just the second in which he’s expected to get the bulk of his starts in the outfield. He racked up a career-high 103 starts at third base in 2017 and slashed .249/.334/.424 with 13 home runs in 464 plate appearances.

While the rest of the outfield is “wide open,” per Mattingly’s comments, there are any number of rookie outfielders who will get the opportunity to make a favorable impression in camp. Center field prospect Lewis Brinson has just 16 major league games under his belt, but impressed in Triple-A Colorado Springs last year and has the versatility to play all three outfield positions. Magneuris Sierra and Braxton Lee could also fill in center and right field, respectively; Sierra has the proven speed and defensive chops needed for a full-time role in the outfield, while Lee showed promise after breakout performances in Double-A Montgomery and Jacksonville.

Dale Murphy’s son hit in eye by rubber bullet during protest

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Atlanta Braves legend Dale Murphy took to Twitter last night and talked about his son, who was injured while taking part in a protest in Denver.

Murphy said his son nearly lost his eye after he was hit in the face by a rubber bullet while peacefully marching. He later shared a photo (see below). “Luckily, his eye was saved due to a kind stranger that was handing out goggles to protestors shortly before the shooting and another kind stranger that drove him to the ER,” Murphy said.

Murphy had far more to say about the protests, however, than how it related to his son:

“As terrible as this experience has been, we know that it’s practically nothing compared to the systemic racism and violence against Black life that he was protesting in the first place. Black communities across America have been terrorized for centuries by excessive police force . . . If you’re a beneficiary of systemic racism, then you will not be able to dismantle it at no cost to yourself. You will have to put yourself at risk. It might not always result in being physically attacked, but it will require you to make yourself vulnerable.”