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Players, teams rush to avoid arbitration

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As mentioned in yesterday’s post, Friday marked the deadline for players and teams to come to an agreement to avoid arbitration. A player is eligible for arbitration if he has between three and six years of service time. In some cases, players with between two and three years of service time also become eligible for arbitration, known as “super two” players. If an agreement is not reached, both the player and his team submit a salary to an independent arbitrator and make a case for making more money or paying the player less. Either the player’s submitted figure or the team’s is selected; there is no middle ground. Whether or not players go to an arbitration hearing with their teams, they almost always get raises year over year even if they performed poorly.

There was a flurry of action on Friday in which players and their teams reached agreements to avoid going to an arbitration hearing. Here’s that list, which is still incomplete.

Angels

Astros

Athletics

Blue Jays

Braves

Brewers

Cardinals

Cubs

Note: Bryant’s $10.85 million salary is a record for a player eligible for arbitration for the first time. Former Phillies first baseman Ryan Howard previously held the record, earning $10 million in his first year of arbitration eligibility going into the 2008 season.

Diamondbacks

Dodgers

Giants

Indians

Mariners

Marlins

Mets

Nationals

Orioles

Padres

Phillies

Pirates

Rangers

  • IF/OF Jurickson Profar: $1.05 million (second of four years)
  • P Jake Diekman: $2.7125 million (third of three years)
  • P Keone Kela: $1.2 million (first of four years)

Rays

Red Sox

Reds

Rockies

Royals

Tigers

  • P Alex Wilson: $1.925 million (second of three years)
  • P Shane Greene: $1.95 million (first of three years)
  • 3B Nick Castellanos: $6.05 million (second of three years)

Twins

White Sox

Yankees

If a player is not listed, it doesn’t necessarily mean he and his team haven’t reached an agreement — it could just be that the information hasn’t been made public yet. If indeed a player and his team weren’t able to come to terms, then the two sides will hash things out in an arbitration hearing next month.

As of right now, the known players who did not come to an agreement with their teams…

  • Astros: OF George Springer, P Ken Giles, P Collin McHugh
    • Springer filed for $10.5 million, Astros for $8.5 million
    • Giles filed for $4.6  million, Astros for $4.2 million
    • McHugh filed for $5 million, Astros for $4.55 million
  • Athletics: P Kendall Graveman
    • Graveman filed for $2.6 million, Athletics for $2.36 million
  • Blue Jays: P Marcus Stroman, P Roberto Osuna
    • Stroman filed for $6.9 million, Blue Jays for $6.5 million
    • Osuna filed for $5.8 million, Blue Jays for $5.3 million
  • Braves: P Mike Foltynewicz
    • Foltynewicz filed for $2.3 million, Braves for $2.2 million
  • Cubs: P Justin Grimm
    • Grimm filed for $2.475 million, Cubs for $2.2 million
  • Diamondbacks: P Shelby Miller
    • Miller filed for $4.9 million, Diamondbacks for $4.7 million
  • Indians: P Trevor Bauer
    • Bauer filed for $6.525 million, Indians for $5.3 million
  • Marlins: C J.T. Realmuto, 1B Justin Bour
    • Realmuto filed for $3.5 million, Marlins for $2.9 million
    • Bour filed for $3.4 million, Marlins for $3 million
  • Mets: P Zack Wheeler
    • Wheeler filed for $1.9 million, Mets for $1.5 million
  • Orioles: P Kevin Gausman, 2B Jonathan Schoop
    • Gausman filed for $6.225 million, Orioles for $5.3 million
    • Schoop filed for $9 million, Orioles for $7.5 million
  • Pirates: P Felipe Rivero
    • Rivero filed for $2.9 million, Pirates for $2.4 million
  • Rays: P Jake Odorizzi, SS Adeiny Hechavarria
    • Odorizzi filed for $6.3 million, Rays for $6.05 million
    • Hechavarria filed for $5.9 million, Rays for $5.35 million
  • Red Sox: OF Mookie Betts
    • Betts filed for $10.5 million, Red Sox for $7.5 million
  • Reds: 2B Scooter Gennett, 3B Eugenio Suarez
    • Gennett filed for $5.7 million, Reds for $5.1 million
    • Suarez filed for $4.2 million, Reds for $3.75 million
  • Royals: P Brandon Maurer
    • Maurer filed for $3.95 million, Royals for $2.95 million
  • Tigers: SS Jose Iglesias
    • Iglesias filed for $6.8 million, Tigers for $5.6 million
  • Twins: P Kyle Gibson
    • Gibson filed for $4.55 million, Twins for $4.2 million
  • White Sox: OF Avisail Garcia, 2B Yolmer Sanchez
    • Garcia filed for $6.7 million, White Sox for $5.85 million
    • Sanchez filed for $2.35 million, White Sox for $2.1 million

Pete Alonso wins 2019 National League Rookie of the Year Award

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Mets first baseman Pete Alonso was named the 2019 National League Rookie of the Year as voted on by the Baseball Writers Association of America. He received 29 of 30 first-place votes.

Alonso, 24, made the Mets’ Opening Day roster and, like Álvarez, looked major league-ready as soon as he debuted. He finished the season as the league leader in homers with 53 while also knocking in 120 runs, scoring 103 runs, and batting .260/.358/.583 over 693 trips to the plate. FanGraphs listed Alonso with 4.8 WAR, by far the most among rookies. Alonso also won a little thing called the Home Run Derby, earning $1 million in the process. He donated $50,000 apiece to two charities, Tunnel to Towers Foundation and the Wounded Warrior Project.

Alonso, rated as the No. 48 prospect in baseball before the season started, is the first Met to win the award since starter Jacob deGrom in 2014. He is the sixth Met to win it, joining deGrom as well as Dwight Gooden (1984), Darryl Strawberry (1983), Jon Matlack (1972), and Tom Seaver (1967).

Braves starter Mike Soroka finished in second place and Padres shortstop Fernando Tatis Jr. finished in third. Also receiving votes were Bryan Reynolds, Dakota Hudson, and Victor Robles.