Getty Images

Players, teams rush to avoid arbitration

2 Comments

As mentioned in yesterday’s post, Friday marked the deadline for players and teams to come to an agreement to avoid arbitration. A player is eligible for arbitration if he has between three and six years of service time. In some cases, players with between two and three years of service time also become eligible for arbitration, known as “super two” players. If an agreement is not reached, both the player and his team submit a salary to an independent arbitrator and make a case for making more money or paying the player less. Either the player’s submitted figure or the team’s is selected; there is no middle ground. Whether or not players go to an arbitration hearing with their teams, they almost always get raises year over year even if they performed poorly.

There was a flurry of action on Friday in which players and their teams reached agreements to avoid going to an arbitration hearing. Here’s that list, which is still incomplete.

Angels

Astros

Athletics

Blue Jays

Braves

Brewers

Cardinals

Cubs

Note: Bryant’s $10.85 million salary is a record for a player eligible for arbitration for the first time. Former Phillies first baseman Ryan Howard previously held the record, earning $10 million in his first year of arbitration eligibility going into the 2008 season.

Diamondbacks

Dodgers

Giants

Indians

Mariners

Marlins

Mets

Nationals

Orioles

Padres

Phillies

Pirates

Rangers

  • IF/OF Jurickson Profar: $1.05 million (second of four years)
  • P Jake Diekman: $2.7125 million (third of three years)
  • P Keone Kela: $1.2 million (first of four years)

Rays

Red Sox

Reds

Rockies

Royals

Tigers

  • P Alex Wilson: $1.925 million (second of three years)
  • P Shane Greene: $1.95 million (first of three years)
  • 3B Nick Castellanos: $6.05 million (second of three years)

Twins

White Sox

Yankees

If a player is not listed, it doesn’t necessarily mean he and his team haven’t reached an agreement — it could just be that the information hasn’t been made public yet. If indeed a player and his team weren’t able to come to terms, then the two sides will hash things out in an arbitration hearing next month.

As of right now, the known players who did not come to an agreement with their teams…

  • Astros: OF George Springer, P Ken Giles, P Collin McHugh
    • Springer filed for $10.5 million, Astros for $8.5 million
    • Giles filed for $4.6  million, Astros for $4.2 million
    • McHugh filed for $5 million, Astros for $4.55 million
  • Athletics: P Kendall Graveman
    • Graveman filed for $2.6 million, Athletics for $2.36 million
  • Blue Jays: P Marcus Stroman, P Roberto Osuna
    • Stroman filed for $6.9 million, Blue Jays for $6.5 million
    • Osuna filed for $5.8 million, Blue Jays for $5.3 million
  • Braves: P Mike Foltynewicz
    • Foltynewicz filed for $2.3 million, Braves for $2.2 million
  • Cubs: P Justin Grimm
    • Grimm filed for $2.475 million, Cubs for $2.2 million
  • Diamondbacks: P Shelby Miller
    • Miller filed for $4.9 million, Diamondbacks for $4.7 million
  • Indians: P Trevor Bauer
    • Bauer filed for $6.525 million, Indians for $5.3 million
  • Marlins: C J.T. Realmuto, 1B Justin Bour
    • Realmuto filed for $3.5 million, Marlins for $2.9 million
    • Bour filed for $3.4 million, Marlins for $3 million
  • Mets: P Zack Wheeler
    • Wheeler filed for $1.9 million, Mets for $1.5 million
  • Orioles: P Kevin Gausman, 2B Jonathan Schoop
    • Gausman filed for $6.225 million, Orioles for $5.3 million
    • Schoop filed for $9 million, Orioles for $7.5 million
  • Pirates: P Felipe Rivero
    • Rivero filed for $2.9 million, Pirates for $2.4 million
  • Rays: P Jake Odorizzi, SS Adeiny Hechavarria
    • Odorizzi filed for $6.3 million, Rays for $6.05 million
    • Hechavarria filed for $5.9 million, Rays for $5.35 million
  • Red Sox: OF Mookie Betts
    • Betts filed for $10.5 million, Red Sox for $7.5 million
  • Reds: 2B Scooter Gennett, 3B Eugenio Suarez
    • Gennett filed for $5.7 million, Reds for $5.1 million
    • Suarez filed for $4.2 million, Reds for $3.75 million
  • Royals: P Brandon Maurer
    • Maurer filed for $3.95 million, Royals for $2.95 million
  • Tigers: SS Jose Iglesias
    • Iglesias filed for $6.8 million, Tigers for $5.6 million
  • Twins: P Kyle Gibson
    • Gibson filed for $4.55 million, Twins for $4.2 million
  • White Sox: OF Avisail Garcia, 2B Yolmer Sanchez
    • Garcia filed for $6.7 million, White Sox for $5.85 million
    • Sanchez filed for $2.35 million, White Sox for $2.1 million

Rumor: MLB execs discussing 100-game season that would begin July 1

David Price and Mookie Betts
Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images
7 Comments

Matt Spiegel of 670 The Score Chicago heard from a source that Major League Baseball executives have been discussing a 100-game season that would begin on July 1 and conclude on October 15. It would essentially pick up the second half schedule, eliminating the All-Star Game while hosting the World Series at a neutral warm-weather stadium — ideally Dodger Stadium.

In the event the Dodgers, who won 106 games last year, made it all the way through the playoffs, the World Series would be hosted in Anaheim or San Diego. The earlier rounds of the playoffs would be played in the cities of the teams involved, which might be tough since the postseason would extend into November.

Spiegel went on to describe this vision as “an absolute best case scenario,” and that’s accurate. In order for the regular season to begin on July 1, the players would need to have several weeks if not a full month prior to get back into playing shape — more or less an abbreviated second spring training. And that would mean the U.S. having made significant progress against the virus by way of herd immunity or a vaccine, which would allow for nonessential businesses to resume operations. The U.S., sadly, is faring not so well compared to other nations around the world for a variety of reasons, but all of which point to a return to normalcy by the summer seeming rather unlikely.

Regardless, the league does have to plan for the potential of being able to start the regular season this summer just in case things really do break right and offer that opportunity. Commissioner Rob Manfred has stated multiple times about the league’s need to be creative, referring to ideas like playing deep into the fall, changing up the location of games, playing without fans in attendance, etc. This rumor certainly fits the “creative” mold.