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Report: Nationals interested in Lance Lynn

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Free agent right-hander Lance Lynn has garnered considerable interest around the league this offseason, most recently from the Nationals. The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal speculates that the team would be hard-pressed to accommodate someone with Lynn’s asking price, given that they’ve already blown past the $197 million luxury tax threshold, but that still may not prevent them from making an offer.

Lynn, 30, thrived in his first full season since undergoing Tommy John surgery in late 2015. While he has yet to return to the sub-3.00 ERA, 3.0+ fWAR totals of seasons past, he had a healthy, productive run with the Cardinals in 2017, going 11-8 in a career-high 33 starts and turning in a 3.43 ERA, 3.8 BB/9 and 7.4 SO/9 in 186 1/3 innings. Better still, he managed to dodge the disabled list entirely, missing just four days with a blister on his throwing hand and exhibiting no signs of recurring elbow issues.

Of course, the Nationals aren’t the only ones who want to buy in on a stable veteran starter. The Brewers, Orioles, Rangers and Twins have all been connected to Lynn at various points throughout the winter, though no clear frontrunner has emerged just yet. Both the Brewers and Orioles are arguably better-positioned to make a play for Lynn, but they currently appear more invested in fellow free agent right-hander Alex Cobb, who is still on the market after rejecting a three-year, $42 million offer from the Cubs earlier this offseason.

Scott Boras to pay salaries of released minor league clients

Scott Boras
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Across the league, scores of minor leaguers have been released in recent days. Already overworked and underpaid, these players are now left without any kind of reliable income during a pandemic, and during a time of civil unrest.

Jon Heyman reports that agent Scott Boras will pay the salaries of his minor league clients who were among those released. It’s a great and much-needed gesture. Boras described the releases as “completely unanticipated.”

Boras, of course, is perhaps the most successful sports agent of all time, so he and his company can afford to do this. That being said, it should be incumbent on the players’ teams — not their agents or their teammates — to take care of them in a time of crisis. Boras is, effectively, subsidizing the billionaire owners’ thriftiness.