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Reports: Cubs close to deal for Brandon Morrow

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The Cubs are reportedly close to a deal for free agent right-hander Brandon Morrow, per CBS Chicago’s Bruce Levine and FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman. This gels with Levine’s report from Saturday, in which he hinted that the club appeared likely to make a move before the Winter Meetings on Monday with Morrow, right-handed starter Alex Cobb and free agent reliever Addison Reed ranked high on their wish list. While the Cubs have not publicly confirmed the signing, Jeff Passan reports that it will be a two-year contract with an option at “$10 or $11 million [per] year” (via Heyman).

Morrow, 33, recently polished off a one-year stint as the Dodgers’ setup man. He pitched to a sterling 2.06 ERA, 1.9 BB/9, 10.3 SO/9 and 0.0 HR/9 in 43 2/3 innings, earning 1.7 fWAR and making 2017 his most valuable season since his 2012 run with the Blue Jays. More importantly, he managed to stay healthy for the entire season, exhibiting no signs of the shoulder inflammation and forearm issues that plagued him over the last four years.

In November, Morrow expressed a desire to remain with the Dodgers — assuming, of course, that they were willing to pony up the kind of multi-year deal he’s currently seeking. There doesn’t appear to be any movement on that front, however, and the Cubs can offer Morrow something the Dodgers can’t: the opportunity to convert to a closing role.

Scott Boras to pay salaries of released minor league clients

Scott Boras
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Across the league, scores of minor leaguers have been released in recent days. Already overworked and underpaid, these players are now left without any kind of reliable income during a pandemic, and during a time of civil unrest.

Jon Heyman reports that agent Scott Boras will pay the salaries of his minor league clients who were among those released. It’s a great and much-needed gesture. Boras described the releases as “completely unanticipated.”

Boras, of course, is perhaps the most successful sports agent of all time, so he and his company can afford to do this. That being said, it should be incumbent on the players’ teams — not their agents or their teammates — to take care of them in a time of crisis. Boras is, effectively, subsidizing the billionaire owners’ thriftiness.