Associated Press

Chris Iannetta signs a two-year deal with the Rockies

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that the Rockies have agreed to a two-year deal with Chris Iannetta. Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports it’s a two-year deal worth $8.5 million.

Iannetta spent his first six seasons with the Rockies before four seasons in Anaheim and a season each in Seattle and Arizona. He’s coming off a nice 2017 campaign in which he hit .254/.354/.511 with 17 homers in 89 games.

Iannetta is really not a full-time catcher anymore, though he’s probably something more than a backup, which makes the whole Jonathan Lucroy free agency situation interesting. Lucroy says he wants to come back to the Rockies. Iannetta’s presence doesn’t necessarily foreclose that, but it does give the Rockies the option of going with more of a platoon or a shared duties thing with Iannetta splitting time with some combination of Tony Wolters or Tom Murphy as opposed to a regular starter/backup situation. And they’d certainly save some money if they didn’t pursue Lucroy.

Chris Paddack loses no-hit bid in eighth inning vs. Marlins

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Update (9:16 PM ET): Aaaaaand it’s over. Just like that. Starlin Castro led off the eighth inning with a solo home run to left field. That ends the shutout bid as well, obviously.

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Padres starter Chris Paddack has kept the Marlins hitless through seven innings on Wednesday evening in Miami. The right-hander has allowed two base runners on a throwing error and a walk while striking out seven on 82 pitches.

The Padres’ offense provided Paddack with three runs of support, all coming in the fourth on Greg Garcia‘s RBI single and a two-run home run by Austin Hedges.

Paddack, 23, entered Wednesday’s start carrying a 2.84 ERA with an 87/18 K/BB ratio across 82 1/3 innings in his rookie campaign.

Among all 30 teams, the Padres are the only one without a no-hitter. They came into the league in 1969. The Marlins were last victims of a no-hitter on September 28, 2014 when Jordan Zimmermann — then with the Nationals — accomplished the feat.