Giancarlo Stanton: ‘All teams have plenty of money’

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The other day, when Derek Jeter made a public appearance at the owners’ meetings, he talked about how the Marlins are losing money, necessitating serious budget cuts. “It’s an organization that’s been losing money for quite some time,” the Marlins CEP said, “so we have to turn that around.”

Sadly, no one asked him right after that why he just joined in to pay over a billion bucks for this money-losing endeavor. I guess everyone thought it’d be rude to rub his financial irresponsibility in his face.

Haha, just kidding. Everyone knows that Jeter is no dummy. He bought a major league franchise because he, like every other owner, knows that they are licenses to print money. No claim that a baseball team is losing money, year-over-year, should be taken at face value. Just ask Jeff Loria, Jeter’s predecessor, who managed to find all manner of ways to make money off of his franchise that, somehow, did not show up in final numbers he would talk about yet never publicly reveal (do a word search for “Double Play Company”). But even if they do lose money in annual cash flow, these franchises have appreciated at preposterous rates over the years, ensuring an eventual windfall.

Giancarlo Stanton knows this. The man who Derek Jeter is going to trade because of all the money he makes is unfazed by Jeter’s claims or the claims of teams which say they are unable to take on his $295 million contract. From the St. Louis Post-Dispatch:

That is to say that Stanton, who led the league with 59 homers and 132 runs batted in, wants to play for a contender, which the Marlins aren’t, even with him. But did he really think the new Miami ownership, plotting to cut deeply into payroll, would make any significant pitching moves that would satisfy him?.

“I’m not entirely sure, to be honest,” he said. “But I know all teams have plenty of money.”

Some more than others, of course. “Yes, that’s true,” he said. “But plenty, nonetheless.”

Someone will, eventually, pony up for Stanton. It will cost them a lot of money, yes. But they have it.

Aaron Judge out of Yankees starting lineup for finale after No. 62

Tim Heitman-USA TODAY Sports
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ARLINGTON, Texas — Yankees slugger Aaron Judge wasn’t in the starting lineup for New York’s regular-season finale, a day after his 62nd home run that broke Roger Maris’ 61-year-old American League single-season record.

When Judge homered in the first inning Tuesday night, in the second game of a doubleheader against the Texas Rangers, it was his 55th consecutive game. He has played in 157 games overall for the AL East champions.

With the first-round bye in the playoffs, the Yankees won’t open postseason play until the AL Division Series starts next Tuesday.

Even though Judge had indicated that he hoped to play Wednesday, manager Aaron Boone said after Tuesday night’s game that they would have a conversation and see what made the most sense.

“Short conversation,” Boone said before Wednesday’s game, adding that he was “pretty set on probably giving him the day today.”

Asked if there was a scenario in which Judge would pinch hit, Boone responded, “I hope not.”

Judge went into the final day of the regular season batting .311, trailing American League batting average leader Minnesota’s Luis Arraez, who was hitting .315. Judge was a wide leader in the other Triple Crown categories, with his 62 homers and 131 RBIs.

Boone said that “probably the one temptation” to play Judge had been the long shot chance the slugger had to become the first AL Triple Crown winner since Detroit’s Miguel Cabrera in 2012.