Roy Halladay dies in plane crash in Gulf of Mexico

37 Comments

A small airplane crashed into the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Pasco County, Florida this afternoon. After hours of growing speculation, the Pasco County Sheriff’s Office confirmed moments ago that the owner and pilot of the plane was retired Phillies and Blue Jays star Roy Halladay. He was the only person on board and was killed in the crash. He was 40 years old.

Halladay was an amateur pilot whose social media accounts were dominated of late by photos and videos of his plane and his flights. He recently purchased an Icon A5 aircraft, which is a light amphibious sport plane. He posted about buying it just a few weeks ago. Photos from the crash site show an Icon A5, with the same tail number as the plane Halladay purchased in mid-October and of which he posted pictures to his social media accounts:

The Pasco County Sheriff referred all questions regarding the circumstances of the crash to the National Transportation Safety Board. They will no doubt be following up with public statements soon.

Halladay pitched in the majors for 16 years, starring for the Toronto Blue Jays and Philadelphia Phillies, winning Cy Young Awards in 2003 and 2010. He retired after the 2013 season with a career record of 203-105 and a 3.38 ERA. He was, without question, a Hall of Fame talent.

The Phillies released the following statement: “We are numb over the very tragic news about Roy Halladay’s untimely death. There are no words to describe the sadness that the entire Phillies family is feeling over the loss of one of the most respected human beings to ever play the game. It is with the heaviest of hearts that we pass along our condolences to Brandy, Ryan and Braden.”

Major League Baseball followed with a statement of their own:

The Blue Jays, the franchise with which Halladay broke into the majors, released the following statement: “The Toronto Blue Jays organization is overcome by gried with the tragic loss of one of the franchise’s greatest and most respected players, but even better human being. It is impossible to express what he has meant to this franchise, the city and its fans. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family and friends.”

Roger Clemens says he’s not running for Congress

Getty Images
10 Comments

Apparently some people in Texas wanted Roger Clemens to run for Congress? At least enough people to where Clemens felt it necessary to tell Pete Olson, the congressman whose seat is going vacant due to his retirement, that, no, he had no interest in running for it.

From ESPN:

“The climate in politics at this time is much more than I would want to undertake, along with my family considerations,” Clemens said in a message to Olson that was obtained by ABC News.

“I am a Republican and I support our President and will continue to do so,” Clemens said. “No matter who our President may be, I will continue my support of them and root for them to be successful, just as I did when President Obama was in office.”

That’s a pretty diplomatic answer from Clemens. But even if he did not have family concerns and even if the “climate” disinterested him, I’m struggling to imagine Clemens as a viable political candidate in the first place.

For as good a pitcher as he was — and for as generally popular as he may be in Texas — the guy has some serious baggage, right? And I mean that beyond just the broad arc of the PEDs controversy that surrounded him for so long. The specifics of that controversy spun off his indictment for perjury before Congress, for example. He was acquitted — and I think it was a proper acquittal — but that was not exactly his finest hour.

It also led to a nasty battle of defamation lawsuits with a drug dealer that, remarkably, caused Clemens to come off way worse than the drug dealer, and that’s quite a trick. That whole process also revealed that he had an extraordinarily problematic extra-marital relationship with a now-dead country music singer. In all, it was a profound, 100% self-inflicted, reputation-trashing, public relations disaster that, even years later, he has taken no responsibility for. It was the sort of episode that, in addition to the ammo it might give any political opponent he may have, calls into serious questions Clemens’ judgment and sense of strategy, both of which are things that, to put it lightly, can be useful in politics.

Clemens, of course, is not going to cite any of those things as a reason for not wanting to run for office, nor does he have to. His simple “no” is all he needs to say and he can go back doing whatever it is he does for the Houston Astros.

But I am struggling mightily to understand why those people who are apparently encouraging him to run for office are doing so despite all of that being out there on the record. Is fame all that matters in politics now? Is a win bought by fame the be-all and end-all, even it means electing a candidate who is profoundly compromised both ethically and morally?

Haha, just kidding. You don’t need to answer that. I think we already know the answer.