Roy Halladay dies in plane crash in Gulf of Mexico

37 Comments

A small airplane crashed into the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Pasco County, Florida this afternoon. After hours of growing speculation, the Pasco County Sheriff’s Office confirmed moments ago that the owner and pilot of the plane was retired Phillies and Blue Jays star Roy Halladay. He was the only person on board and was killed in the crash. He was 40 years old.

Halladay was an amateur pilot whose social media accounts were dominated of late by photos and videos of his plane and his flights. He recently purchased an Icon A5 aircraft, which is a light amphibious sport plane. He posted about buying it just a few weeks ago. Photos from the crash site show an Icon A5, with the same tail number as the plane Halladay purchased in mid-October and of which he posted pictures to his social media accounts:

The Pasco County Sheriff referred all questions regarding the circumstances of the crash to the National Transportation Safety Board. They will no doubt be following up with public statements soon.

Halladay pitched in the majors for 16 years, starring for the Toronto Blue Jays and Philadelphia Phillies, winning Cy Young Awards in 2003 and 2010. He retired after the 2013 season with a career record of 203-105 and a 3.38 ERA. He was, without question, a Hall of Fame talent.

The Phillies released the following statement: “We are numb over the very tragic news about Roy Halladay’s untimely death. There are no words to describe the sadness that the entire Phillies family is feeling over the loss of one of the most respected human beings to ever play the game. It is with the heaviest of hearts that we pass along our condolences to Brandy, Ryan and Braden.”

Major League Baseball followed with a statement of their own:

The Blue Jays, the franchise with which Halladay broke into the majors, released the following statement: “The Toronto Blue Jays organization is overcome by gried with the tragic loss of one of the franchise’s greatest and most respected players, but even better human being. It is impossible to express what he has meant to this franchise, the city and its fans. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family and friends.”

The Nationals have inquired about Kris Bryant

Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Washington Nationals, fresh off signing Stephen Strasburg to a $245 million deal, are now turning their attention to their third base hole. Jon Morosi of MLB.com reports that they have made inquiries to the Chicago Cubs about trading for Kris Bryant.

Emphasis on the word “inquiry” because it’d be premature for the Cubs to trade Bryant at the moment, even if they are reported to be considering the possibility.

Bryant and the Cubs are awaiting word from an arbitrator about Bryant’s years-old service time grievance. If Bryant wins, he becomes a free agent after the 2020 season. If the Cubs win they control him for two more years. The team may or may not choose to trade him in either case as they are reportedly trying to cut payroll, but the price for him will vary pretty significantly depending on whether or not the acquiring club will receive one or two years of control over the former MVP.

For Washington, this would be a means of replacing free agent third baseman Anthony Rendon. Or, perhaps, the inquiries are a means of creating a tad more leverage for the Nats as they talk to Rendon’s agent about re-signing him.

Which, in the past, the Nats said they could not do if they also re-signed Strasburg, though I suspect that’s just posturing too. They may not want to spend big money to keep their World Series core together, but they can afford it. They’re going to see, I suspect, an eight-figure uptick in revenue by virtue of being the defending World Series champs. They are poised to receive a significant payout as a result of recent rulings in their own multi-year dispute with the Orioles and the MASN network. They are, of course, owned by billionaire real estate moguls. All of that taken together means that, if they choose to, they can bring back Rendon. Assuming he chooses to come back too.

But, if that doesn’t happen, they appear to be giving themselves options at the hot corner.