Neither Kenley Jansen nor Yasiel Puig took issue with Carlos Correa’s bat flip

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Last night, in the 10th inning of Game 2 of the World Series, Astros shortstop Carlos Correa exuberantly flipped his bat when he hit a solo home run off of Josh Fields. Here’s the video:

The Dodgers ended up losing 7-6 in 11 innings. It would have been easy for the Dodgers to be salty about it and about Correa showing them up. But neither closer Kenley Jansen, who gave up a game-tying home run to Marwin Gonzalez in the ninth, nor Yasiel Puig — a bat-flipping guru himself — blamed Correa for celebrating.

Per MLB.com’s Mike Petriello, Jansen said, “You can do whatever you want to if you hit me out. I don’t care. You got me.”

And, via MLB.com’s Joshua Thornton, Puig said, “I loved it. It was a little higher than the bat flips I normally do. He was happy and that’s the way you should play in the World Series. Not everybody gets to play in a place like this. It’s good that he plays like that and it’s good that Latino players are able to contribute that way. He wasn’t batting too well and he was only getting a few hits and when he got the home run it was a moment for him to be happy. I’m glad that he was able to celebrate that.”

Contrast that to the Rangers, who were victims of Jose Bautista‘s bat flip in Game 5 of the 2015 ALDS. On May 15 the next year, the Rangers and Blue Jays met for the final time during the regular season. In the top of the eighth inning, ostensibly Bautista’s last at-bat against the Rangers that year, Matt Bush hit him with a fastball. Bautista then slid late and hard into second baseman Rougned Odor trying to break up a double play attempt, which led to Odor shoving Bautista and punching him in the face. If only the Rangers had as much chill as the Dodgers.

Royals, Alex Gordon close to contract agreement

Alex Gordon
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MLB.com’s Jeffrey Flanagan reports that the Royals and outfielder Alex Gordon are “getting close” to an agreement on a one-year contract. Terms of the deal aren’t yet known, but the Royals could make it official within the next few days.

Gordon, who turns 36 years old next month, hit .266/.345/.396 with 13 home runs and 76 RBI over 633 plate appearances with the Royals this past season. His offense has waned, owning an adjusted OPS of 84 since 2016 (100 is average), but he still plays decent defense.

Gordon has spent all 13 years of his major league career with the Royals. With the club in a rebuilding phase, he will serve as the clubhouse leader and be a mentor to younger players on the roster.