Neither Kenley Jansen nor Yasiel Puig took issue with Carlos Correa’s bat flip

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Last night, in the 10th inning of Game 2 of the World Series, Astros shortstop Carlos Correa exuberantly flipped his bat when he hit a solo home run off of Josh Fields. Here’s the video:

The Dodgers ended up losing 7-6 in 11 innings. It would have been easy for the Dodgers to be salty about it and about Correa showing them up. But neither closer Kenley Jansen, who gave up a game-tying home run to Marwin Gonzalez in the ninth, nor Yasiel Puig — a bat-flipping guru himself — blamed Correa for celebrating.

Per MLB.com’s Mike Petriello, Jansen said, “You can do whatever you want to if you hit me out. I don’t care. You got me.”

And, via MLB.com’s Joshua Thornton, Puig said, “I loved it. It was a little higher than the bat flips I normally do. He was happy and that’s the way you should play in the World Series. Not everybody gets to play in a place like this. It’s good that he plays like that and it’s good that Latino players are able to contribute that way. He wasn’t batting too well and he was only getting a few hits and when he got the home run it was a moment for him to be happy. I’m glad that he was able to celebrate that.”

Contrast that to the Rangers, who were victims of Jose Bautista‘s bat flip in Game 5 of the 2015 ALDS. On May 15 the next year, the Rangers and Blue Jays met for the final time during the regular season. In the top of the eighth inning, ostensibly Bautista’s last at-bat against the Rangers that year, Matt Bush hit him with a fastball. Bautista then slid late and hard into second baseman Rougned Odor trying to break up a double play attempt, which led to Odor shoving Bautista and punching him in the face. If only the Rangers had as much chill as the Dodgers.

Red Sox want to trade Jackie Bradley Jr.

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Pete Abraham of the Boston Globe reports that the Red Sox are actively trying to trade outfielder Jackie Bradley Jr. In fact, the Mets were discussing such a trade with the Mets before they ultimately acquired Jake Marisnick from the Astros last week.

The Red Sox have made it no secret that they plan to reduce payroll. They’re currently above $218 million, about $10 million above the competitive balance tax threshold. Bradley is projected to earn $11.5 million in his third and final year of arbitration eligibility.

While Bradley continued to play above-average defense, his offense has left a bit to be desired. He has an aggregate adjusted OPS of 90 over the past three seasons (100 is average), matching his mark of 90 in 2019 specifically. Bradley hit .225/.317/.421 with 21 home runs, 62 RBI, and 69 runs scored in 567 plate appearances.

Since an acquiring team would likely be on the hook for most or all of Bradley’s salary, the Red Sox wouldn’t get much in return in a trade. With the Mets out of the picture, the Cubs and Diamondbacks are a couple of teams that could match up with the Red Sox on a trade involving Bradley.