Getty Images

Astros take first World Series win with a wild 7-6 comeback in Game 2

12 Comments

The Astros don’t have a guaranteed championship title yet, but you can’t say they’re never won a World Series game. Marwin Gonzalez sparked a stunning rally in the ninth inning of Game 2 on Wednesday, going deep against the Dodgers’ Kenley Jansen before George Springer cemented the 7-6 win with his second postseason home run in the 11th.

With Verlander on the mound, the Dodgers knew this was going to be a tough one to win, even with the benefit of home-field advantage. They were stifled through 4 2/3 no-hit innings as Verlander fried the strike zone with 42 strikes, whiffing five of 10 batters before Joc Pederson broke up his bid with a game-tying two-out home run in the fifth.

That wasn’t enough for the Dodgers, who returned in the sixth with Corey Seager’s two-run, 383-foot blast. (No one, it should be noted, was more thrilled by this than Clayton Kershaw.) Verlander hadn’t given up more than a double since Game 4 of the ALDS, when Andrew Benintendi scored a fifth-inning solo shot in an eventual 5-4 loss to the Astros.

The home runs could not have been more timely. Rich Hill struggled to replicate the same kind of dominance that powered Clayton Kershaw’s Game 1 win on Tuesday. He started the game with a seven-pitch walk to George Springer and worked into a jam in the third inning, issuing base hits to Josh Reddick and George Springer before Alex Bregman plated a run on a line drive to left field. The fourth inning was another mixed bag; the Astros put a runner in scoring position thanks to a pair of walks from Hill and a passed ball by Austin Barnes, but the southpaw shut down their rally with a pair of three-pitch strikeouts to Gonzalez and Verlander.

It wasn’t enough to hold the Astros back forever, though. Hill made his exit after four innings, leaving the remaining five innings to the bullpen. Kenta Maeda, Tony Watson, Ross Stripling and Brandon Morrow combined for a scoreless fifth, sixth and seventh, but just as they were preparing to wind down and clinch the win, Houston caught another break in the eighth. Bregman lined a double into the right field corner that just tipped off the edge of Yasiel Puig‘s glove, causing Puig to chuck his glove at the warning track in frustration.

Kenley Jansen promptly replaced Morrow, but Altuve’s groundout moved Bregman to third base and Correa’s RBI single plated another run. It was the first run the bullpen had given up in an MLB-record 28 postseason innings and the first Jansen had given up all month. In the ninth, Gonzalez did one better, mashing a 398-foot home run to tie the game.

The real kicker came in extras. Altuve wasted no time putting up his first World Series home run to take the lead in the top of the 10th, while Correa provided the exclamation point to the Astros’ rally with his own 427-foot blast, marking the first back-to-back extra-inning homers in World Series history.

The Dodgers retaliated with Puig’s solo home run in the bottom of the inning, tying the game up again with Enrique Hernandez‘s two-out RBI single. In the 11th, with Dave Roberts fresh out of relievers not named Brandon McCarthy, George Springer returned for the go-ahead home run. One Charlie Culberson home run and Chris Devenski game-ending strikeout later, the Astros secured the long-awaited conclusion to their four-hour, 19-minute contest.

The series is headed back to Houston on Friday, where Yu Darvish will attempt to regain the lead against Lance McCullers. The Astros, unlike their World Series rivals, have yet to lose at home this October. Game time is scheduled for 8:00 PM ET; luckily for all those in attendance, the forecast is much more temperate.

Gio González exits NLCS Game 4 start after twisting ankle

Harry How/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Brewers starter Gio González was forced to exit his NLCS Game 4 start against the Dodgers in the second inning after twisting his left ankle attempting to field a comebacker hit by Yasiel Puig. González leaped, deflected the ball and twisted his ankle landing, then went after the ball but Puig reached base easily.

The Brewers’ trainer and manager Craig Counsell came out to the mound to observe González throwing some practice pitches. He was clearly in pain but was allowed to stay in. He threw one pitch to Austin Barnes and very visibly grimaced after completing his wind-up. Counsell came back out to the mound and took a visibly upset González out of the game. Freddy Peralta came in relief to finish out the at-bat. González probably shouldn’t have been allowed to stay in the game in the first place, but sometimes a player’s competitiveness is enough to convince a manager and a trainer.

Upon entering, Peralta issued a walk to Austin Barnes, then got the first out when Rich Hill laid down a mediocre bunt, allowing Peralta to get the lead runner at third base. Peralta struck out Chris Taylor and walked Justin Turner to load the bases with two outs. Dodgers manager Dave Roberts opted to pinch-hit for David Freese with Max Muncy, who struck out looking. Peralta was somehow able to slither out of the jam.

Gonzalez pitched two innings in NLCS Game 1 on Friday. He was quite good after joining the Brewers in a late-August trade with the Nationals, compiling a 2.13 regular season ERA in five starts with his new club. The Brewers will likely provide an update on his status after Tuesday night’s game.