Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

David Price redeems himself with ALDS performances

8 Comments

To say Red Sox starter David Price has been controversial in his first two years in Boston would be an understatement. The lefty inked a seven-year, $217 million contract with the Red Sox as a free agent in December 2015.

Price’s 2016 campaign was decent, though under the high bar he had set for himself. He finished 17-9 with a 3.99 ERA and a 228/50 K/BB ratio in a major league-best 230 innings. He started Game 2 of the ALDS last year and struggled, giving up five runs in 3 1/3 innings against the Indians.

Price experienced elbow soreness early in spring training this year, so he started the regular season on the disabled list. He didn’t make his season debut until May 29. He also missed nearly two months between July 23 and September 16. All told, he made 11 starts and five relief appearances this past regular season, finishing with a 3.38 ERA and a 76/24 K/BB ratio in 74 2/3 innings.

There were also a couple of off-the-field incidents which muddied Price’s reputation. He got into an expletive-filled spat with the media in June, and also had an issue with Hall of Famer and NESN analyst Dennis Eckersley.

The Red Sox did not include Price in their ALDS rotation, starting Chris Sale and Drew Pomeranz in Games 1 and 2 and going with Doug Fister to begin Game 3. That’s not something one would expect to hear about a starter signed for $217 million.

Price has nevertheless proved valuable out of the bullpen. He tossed 2 2/3 scoreless innings of relief in Game 2 when Pomeranz could only last two innings. Price gave up a hit and a walk while striking out two. His performance in Game 3, though, might have redeemed himself with the city of Boston. Fister recorded only four outs before manager John Farrell lifted him from Sunday’s game. Joe Kelly pitched 1 2/3 innings before giving way to Price. The lefty went on to toss four scoreless innings, giving up four hits and a walk with four strikeouts. The Red Sox narrowly hung onto a 4-3 lead from the fourth through seventh innings and finally broke out for a six-spot in the bottom of the seventh. They went on to win 10-3, staying alive in the ALDS.

The Red Sox still have to win each of the next two games if they want to keep their postseason hopes alive. It’s a tall order, for sure, but an order still possible because of the yeoman’s work by Price on Sunday. This may prove to be the turnaround moment in Price’s tenure in Boston.

MLBPA proposes 114-game season, playoff expansion to MLB

LG Patterson/MLB via Getty Images
Leave a comment

ESPN’s Jeff Passan reports that the Major League Baseball Players Association has submitted a proposal to the league concerning the 2020 season. The proposal includes a 114-game season with an end date on October 31, playoff expansion for two years, the right for players to opt out of the season, and a potential deferral of 2020 salaries if the postseason were to be canceled.

Passan clarifies that among the players who choose to opt out, only those that are considered “high risk” would still receive their salaries. The others would simply receive service time. The union also proposed that the players receive a non-refundable $100 million sum advance during what would essentially be Spring Training 2.

If the regular season were to begin in early July, as has often been mentioned as the target, that would give the league four months to cram in 114 games. There would have to be occasional double-headers, or the players would have to be okay with few off-days. Nothing has been mentioned about division realignment or a geographically-oriented schedule, but those could potentially ease some of the burden.

Last week, the owners made their proposal to the union, suggesting a “sliding scale” salary structure. The union did not like that suggestion. Players were very vocal about it, including on social media as Max Scherzer — one of eight players on the union’s executive subcommittee — made a public statement. The owners will soon respond to the union’s proposal. They almost certainly won’t be happy with many of the details, but the two sides can perhaps find a starting point and bridge the gap. As the calendar turns to June, time is running out for the two sides to hammer out an agreement on what a 2020 season will look like.