Associated Press

The Yankees and Indians cross paths once again

5 Comments

One upon a time, there was a 12-year stretch when the New York Yankees won the American League pennant ten times. The team that interrupted that run in both 1948 and 1954: the Cleveland Indians.

Another time, much later, there was a seven year stretch when the Yankees went to the playoffs in seven straight years, winning the pennant five times. The team that won it the other two times: the Cleveland Indians, who won it in 1995 and 1997.

Which is not to say that the Yankees and Indians are rivals, as such. The Yankees have been good far too often and the Indians bad far too often for that to be the case. But they have certainly trod over the same ground at roughly the same time on a number of occasions in baseball history, making for some fun historical connections (and that’s without even mentioning the midge game back in 2007). As such, it’s appropriate for these old American League teams to meet up in the playoffs once again. Not as rivals — if they ever were actual rivals, today’s unbalanced schedules preclude that from being the case now — but as fellow contenders, once again bumping in to one another while on the same path.

This time it feels more like those 1990s encounters, as the Indians are the stronger team, fresh off of an AL pennant while the Yankees are on the rise. They’ve met a few times this year, of course, with the teams splitting four games in Cleveland and the Indians sweeping a three-game series in the Bronx in August. The Indians won 11 more games than the Yankees overall this year. But even if the Indians seem to have an edge, there are similarities between the clubs that seem poised to make this series a great one.

The most obvious similarity: the shutdown bullpens. Each of these clubs boast dominant relievers, with Andrew Miller and Cody Allen anchoring the Tribe’s corps, backed by Danny Salazar and Mike Clevinger. The Yankees have already showed off the depth of their pen in their reliever-heavy Wild Card win, with Chad Green and David Robertson going long and Aroldis Chapman going short. Dellin Betances is down there as well, with a fresh arm, giving Joe Girardi all manner of options if his starters falter. Which, given how things have gone so far in the postseason, is more likely than not.

On offense, there is no more powerful team than the Yankees. They led all of baseball with 241 homers, 52 of which came off the bat of Aaron Judge. Only one club scored more runs than the Bombers did. No team was stingier in allowing homers than the Indians, however, with a league-low 163 hit against them. Indeed, Cleveland featured the best pitching staff in the entire game, allowing a major league-low 3.48 runs per contest. Corey Kluber, who the Yankees will face in Game 2 and, if necessary, a Game 5, is the favorite to win the Cy Young Award.

The oddsmakers have the Indians as favorites to win the World Series, but this is a far more even matchup than the odds and the records suggest. The Indians were dominant late in the year, with an AL-record winning streak stretching from late August and through most of September, but New York played .605 ball in the second half themselves, winning 20 of 28 in the month of September. As they showed on Tuesday night, you can’t keep them down, even if you jump on them early.

Two franchises with a lot of history between them face off in the ALDS starting tonight. All signs point to an historically good series.

Report: Some MLB teams using outside labs for COVID-19 testing

MLB COVID-19 testing
Jason Koerner/Getty Images
1 Comment

The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal and Zach Buchanan report that the Diamondbacks are one of several teams that have used labs other than the Sports Medicine Research and Testing Laboratory in Utah to process COVID-19 testing. MLB has encountered delays with its testing, despite promising 24-hour turnaround time, so teams have tried other avenues — with the league’s endorsement — in order to get faster results.

The SMRTL had processed performance-enhancing drug screenings for MLB. The league converted it to process COVID-19 tests amid concerns that having a season and all of the testing that would be required throughout would take away testing resources from the general public. That some teams are utilizing labs other than the SMRTL suggests the league, indeed, is usurping those resources.

In prospect Seth Beer’s case, he tested positive for COVID-19. He needed to test negative twice consecutively to be cleared to return to play. Beer went to a third-party site in the Phoenix area. He received his second negative test and was cleared to return on July 9.

The Diamondbacks said that the labs they have used have assured them that they are not taking away tests from the public. That seems like a claim MLB and the D-Backs should demonstrably prove. Per Rosenthal and Buchahan, the D-Backs have gone to an outside lab about 20 times, which accounts for less than one percent of COVID-19 tests taken by players and staff. Still, those are 20 tests that could have been used by the general public. And if the D-Backs and a handful of other teams already are using outside labs, then the rest of the league likely already is or soon will be doing the same. In the end, there will be a lot more than 20 tests taken at outside labs by MLB players and staff. Considering that “Tier 1” players will be tested every other day throughout the season, the total of third-party tests taken — if things continue the way they are now — could easily reach into the thousands by the end of October.

We all want baseball back, but the players, coaches, and all other staff are no more important than cashiers, teachers, and delivery drivers, so they shouldn’t have more access to COVID-19 testing simply by virtue of being associated with Major League Baseball and all of its influence and financial muscle. It would be unethical for MLB to be cutting in line ahead of other people who need testing just as much as if not more than the players.