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Aaron Judge had the top-selling jersey this year

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If you’re in to this sort of thing, you should know that Major League Baseball announced the top-selling jerseys of the season today. Yankees slugger Aaron Judge beat out Kris Bryant and Anthony Rizzo of the Cubs for the top spot. Bryant had held the top spot for the past two seasons.

After those three came Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw and Washington Nationals outfielder Bryce Harper. The Cubs led the majors with four players among the top 20 in sales, with Javier Baez 10th and Kyle Schwarber at 14.

Here’s the top 20:

1. Aaron Judge, New York Yankees
2. Kris Bryant, Chicago Cubs
3. Anthony Rizzo, Chicago Cubs
4. Clayton Kershaw, Los Angeles Dodgers
5. Bryce Harper, Washington Nationals
6. Buster Posey, San Francisco Giants
7. Yadier Molina, St. Louis Cardinals
8. Mike Trout, Los Angeles Angels
9. Francisco Lindor, Cleveland Indians
10. Javier Báez, Chicago Cubs
11. Corey Seager, Los Angeles Dodgers
12. Mookie Betts, Boston Red Sox
13. Jose Altuve, Houston Astros
14. Kyle Schwarber, Chicago Cubs
15. Gary Sánchez, New York Yankees
16. Cody Bellinger, Los Angeles Dodgers
17. Dustin Pedroia, Boston Red Sox
18. Freddie Freeman, Atlanta Braves
19. Noah Syndergaard, New York Mets
20. Nolan Arenado, Colorado Rockies

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.