Baltimore Orioles

Orioles pitcher Miguel Elias Gonzalez dies at 21 in car crash in Dominican Republic

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Orioles minor league pitcher Miguel Elias Gonzalez died from injuries sustained in a car accident in the Dominican Republic on Saturday, the team announced on Monday. Executive vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette said in a statement, “Our organization is deeply saddened by the tragic passing of Miguel Gonzalez. Miguel was beloved by his teammates and coaches in the Dominican Republic. Our thoughts are with his family and friends during this very difficult time.”

The Orioles signed Gonzalez, 21, out of the D.R. on September 28, 2014. He pitched parts of three seasons in the Dominican Summer League, making 13 starts and 25 relief appearances.

Yordano Ventura and Andy Marte were killed in separate car accidents in the Dominican Republic earlier this year, and Oscar Taveras was killed in a car accident in the D.R. in October 2014. Three minor leaguers also died in 2016 in similar fashion. The dangers of driving in the D.R. are well known now and teams now speak to their players about the issue. For instance, back in January, Dave Sheinin of the Washington Post reported that the Nationals had vice president of international players Johnny DiPuglia tell his players at the club’s academy in Boca Chica, D.R., “You drink and drive and there’s a very good chance you’re going to have a grave issue on your hands.” In 2015, the World Health Organization rated the Dominican Republic as the deadliest country in which to drive in the western hemisphere due to lax enforcement of driving laws.

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.