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“Friends” — the key to English for many ballplayers

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There’s a fun article in the New York Times today. James Wagner talks to several Latino major leaguers who are obsessed with the sitcom “Friends.” And who credit it for their English language skills.

Wagner talks to Freddy Galvis, Luis Severino, David Peralta and Miguel Gonzalez, all of whom watch “Friends” all the time and all of whom, in part, learned or improved their English while watching the show. Wilmer Flores too, who says this:

“Now that it’s on Netflix, I always put it on and watch it. When I get up in the morning, I turn on the TV, and whatever episode is there I’ll watch and keep watching. I stop it when I come to the stadium. When I come home from the stadium, I pick up where I left off.”

Liking “Friends” is a matter of taste. I, like everyone else in the 90s, watched it all the time, but it’s aged poorly in my view, at least in a critical sense. But so too was the case with all of the reruns of 60s and 70s shows I watched when I was a kid in the 80s. Those shows were terrible, but sometimes a laugh is a laugh and we could all use the laughs.

As for the English: I seem to remember reading something, somewhere in the 80s about a ballplayer who credited “Brady Bunch” or “Gilligan’s Island” or one of those shows with his English language skills. It was the same general principle: the show was on all the dang time and via repeats and the cliche/obvious situations, it was a lot easier to grok the language due to the context.

UPDATE:

Which is pretty cool. At least until some ballplayer, in a postgame interview, says “Could I look more for my pitch to hit?”

Joe Girardi steps down as manager of USA Baseball

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Baseball is an Olympic sport once again and USA Baseball begins the road to qualifying for the 2020 Games in just a couple of weeks. They’ll be doing it with a new manager, though, as current team USA manager Joe Girardi has stepped down from the role in order to concentrate on his quest to return to managing in the big leagues.

Girardi has interviewed for the Cubs job already and is candidate for the openings with the Mets and the Phillies. His stepping down from the Olympic job suggests that he thinks he stands a pretty good chance of getting one of the seven current openings around the game. Or, at the very least, that he wishes to show clubs with openings that he’s serious.

Girardi will be replaced by Scott Brosius, who was poised to be Girardi’s bench coach with Team USA.

The team begins training in Arizona on October 21. It begins playing qualifier games in early November in Mexico. Eventually, the 2020 Olympic Games will feature a six-nation field.