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Stephen Strasburg’s scoreless innings streak ends at 35 innings

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Nationals starter Stephen Strasburg had his scoreless innings streak end in unfortunate fashion in the top of the second inning on Sunday night against the Dodgers. With Yasiel Puig on third base and two outs, Logan Forsythe hit a fly ball to deep center field. Michael Taylor caught up to the ball but it glanced off of his glove, allowing Puig to score the game’s first run. He was not charged with an error. Strasburg still set the Nationals franchise record for consecutive scoreless innings.

The Nationals came back in the bottom of the sixth, taking a 3-1 lead on Ryan Zimmerman‘s three-run home run off of Ross Stripling. Strasburg, who lasted six innings and gave up just the one run, is in line for the win at the time of this writing.

Prior to Sunday, Strasburg last gave up a run in the bottom of the first inning against the Padres on August 19. Following that, he blanked the Padres in the next five innings, then shut out the Astros for six innings, tossed a complete game shut out against the Marlins, kept the Marlins scoreless in Miami for six frames, and hurled eight shutout innings against the Phillies. On the season, Strasburg is carrying a 2.60 ERA with a 190/44 K/BB ratio in 162 2/3 innings.

Larry Walker to wear a Rockies cap on his Hall of Fame plaque

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I guess this came out the day he was elected but I missed it somehow: Larry Walker is going to have a Rockies cap on his Fall of Fame plaque.

While it was once solely the choice of the inductee, for the past couple of decades the Hall of Fame has had final say on the caps, though the request of the inductee is noted. This is done to prevent a situation in which a cap truly misrepresents history. This issue arose around the time Wade Boggs was inducted, as he reportedly had a deal with the Tampa Bay Devil Rays to pick their cap on his plaque which, to say the least, would’ve been unrepresentative.

There have been some mildly controversial picks in the past, and some guys who would seem to have a clear choice have gone with blank caps to avoid upsetting the fan base of one of his other teams, but Walker’s doesn’t seem all that controversial to me.

Walker played ten years in Colorado to six years in Montreal and two years in St. Louis. His numbers in Colorado were substantial better than in Montreal. His MVP Award, most of his Gold Gloves, most of his All-Star appearances, and all of his black ink with the exception of the NL doubles title in 1994 came with the Rockies too. Walker requested the Rockies cap, noting correctly that he “did more damage” in a Rockies uniform than anyplace else. And, of course, that damage is what got him elected to the Hall of Fame.

Still, I imagine fans of the old Expos will take at least some issue here. Those folks tend to be pretty possessive of their team’s old stars. It’s understandable, I suppose, given that they’ve not gotten any new ones in a decade or two. Add in the fact that Walker played for the 1994 Expos team onto which people love to project things both reasonable and unreasonable, and you can expect that the Expos dead-enders might feel a bit slighted.

Welp, sorry. A Rockies cap is the right choice.  And that’s Walker’s cap will feature.