Matthew Boyd loses no-hitter with two outs in the ninth against the White Sox

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Update (3:53 PM ET): The no-hitter is over. Boyd induced a pop up from Adam Engel for the first out and retired pinch-hitter Kevan Smith with a groundout, but couldn’t close the door against Tim Anderson, who lashed a double into right field to break up the no-hitter. The Tigers still won, 12-0, after Jeimer Candelario’s monster three-run shot in the eighth.

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Tigers’ left-hander Matthew Boyd has no-hit the White Sox through six innings. The lefty carried a perfect game through 2 2/3 innings, but slipped on a five-pitch walk to catcher Rob Brantly to end his bid.

While the White Sox collected zeroes on their half of the scoreboard, the Tigers’ offense kept up a steady stream of runs. Jeimer Candelario put Detroit on the board with an RBI single in the first inning, followed by a run scoring wild pitch in the second, Nicholas Castellanos‘ two-RBI double in the third, JaCoby Jones‘ double in the fourth, Mikie Mahtook‘s two-run homer in the fifth, and another long ball from Castellanos in the bottom of the sixth.

The Tigers chased opposing starter Dylan Covey off the mound by the fourth inning and dealt roughly with reliever Chris Beck, who allowed four runs on four hits for an unsightly 6.67 ERA.

Should Boyd pull off the no-hit attempt, he’ll be the first Tigers’ pitcher to do so since Justin Verlander‘s no-hitter against the Blue Jays in 2011. The White Sox, meanwhile, haven’t been on the receiving end of a no-no since they were no-hit by the Twins’ Francisco Liriano just four days prior to Verlander’s feat.

MLB sells share of BAMTech to Walt Disney Co. for $900M

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NEW YORK – Major League Baseball has sold its remaining share of a streaming service technology company to the Walt Disney Co. for $900 million.

The sale was disclosed Tuesday in Walt Disney Co.’s annual filing report through the SEC. MLB received the $900 million in exchange for the 15% stake it still had in a company called BAMTech, which originally started as MLB Advanced Media in 2000.

The technology helped MLB become a leader in sports streaming in the 2000s.

Walt Disney Co. has been buying chunks of BAMTech for the past five years and now owns 100% of the company. The National Hockey League sold its 10% share of BAMTech to Walt Disney Co. for a reported $350 million in 2021.