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Major League Baseball tweets, “There’s no right or wrong way to play.”

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Bat flipping has been a source of intense controversy in recent years in baseball. Cubs pitcher Jake Arrieta said earlier this year that if a young player flips his bat after hitting a home run off of him, “He might wear the next one in the ribs.”

Blue Jays outfielder Jose Bautista famously flipped his bat after hitting a crucial home run in Game 5 of the 2015 ALDS against the Rangers. He was criticized relentlessly by old-timers for not playing the game “the right way” and the Rangers held a grudge against him that lasted into the middle of the next season when second baseman Rougned Odor punched him. Odor said, “Perhaps he was wrong, and perhaps I was also wrong.”

Phillies outfielder Odubel Herrera, perhaps baseball’s most infamous bat flipper, said earlier this year, “I don’t want to get drilled [in retaliation]. But I’m not going to change the way I play.”

While white players are certainly no strangers to flipping bats, the art was embraced and perfected by international players. ESPN ran a feature in June called the Beisbol Experience. Some players were asked about the difference in cultures. Carlos Beltran said, “Here, baseball is a big business. In Puerto Rico, baseball is more a place where fans go to the field to cheer, to go crazy; there’s loud music.” Carlos Gonzalez said, “Maybe for guys from Cuba and the Dominican Republic, there’s a larger difference because they put more flair into the way they play, and they come to the United States and people don’t really like that.”

September 15 to October 15 is Hispanic Heritage Month. Major League Baseball sent out this tweet with a video:

It’s a great video and encapsulates everything Major League Baseball should be promoting: diversity, enthusiasm, individuality. Except, well, it hasn’t really been promoting any of that otherwise. The mostly-white pitchers who have gone after mostly-Hispanic players like Herrera, Bautista, Yoenis Cespedes, and Yasiel Puig for their celebratory ways have been punished, but it’s hardly been a legitimate effort to stamp out the “play the game the right way” culture that blots out other cultures. As a result, MLB appears two-faced here. You can’t say, “There’s no right or wrong way to play” while giving a relative slap on the wrist to players who throw projectiles at 100 MPH in the vicinity of players’ heads or punch them in the face in retaliation.

If there’s “no right or wrong way to play,” why has Herrera resigned himself to eventually being hurt in retaliation? The tweet above is a great sentiment, but it needs to be backed up by action.

Skaggs Case: Federal Agents have interviewed at least six current or former Angels players

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The Los Angeles Times reports that federal agents have interviewed at least six current and former Angels players as part of their investigation into the death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs.

Among the players questioned: Andrew Heaney, Noé Ramirez, Trevor Cahill, and Matt Harvey. An industry source tells NBC Sports that the interviews by federal agents are part of simultaneous investigations into Skaggs’ death by United States Attorneys in both Texas and California.

There has been no suggestion that the players are under criminal scrutiny or are suspected of using opioids. Rather, they are witnesses to the ongoing investigation and their statements have been sought to shed light on drug use by Skaggs and the procurement of illegal drugs by him and others in and around the club.

Skaggs asphyxiated while under the influence of fentanyl, oxycodone, and alcohol in his Texas hotel room on July 1. This past weekend, ESPN reported that Eric Kay, the Los Angeles Angels’ Director of Communications, knew that Skaggs was an Oxycontin addict, is an addict himself, and purchased opioids for Skaggs and used them with him on multiple occasions. Kay has told DEA agents that, apart from Skaggs, at least five other Angels players are opioid users and that other Angels officials knew of Skaggs’ use. The Angels have denied Kay’s allegations.

In some ways this all resembles what happened in Pittsburgh in the 1980s, when multiple players were interviewed and subsequently called as witnesses in prosecutions that came to be known as the Pittsburgh Drug Trials. There, no baseball players were charged with crimes in connection with what was found to be a cocaine epidemic inside Major League clubhouses, but their presence as witnesses caused the prosecutions to be national news for weeks and months on end.