Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

Bradley Zimmer dives head-first into first base, breaks bone in left hand

14 Comments

Update (10:37 PM, September 11): Bastian reports that Zimmer will undergo surgery as Zimmer suffered a broken fourth metacarpal on the dive attempt. The Indians don’t have a timetable for his recovery yet, but he will very likely miss the rest of the regular season, if not the playoffs.

*

Update (11:46 PM ET): Per MLB.com’s Jordan Bastian, Zimmer suffered a broken bone in his left hand on the slide. He’ll be examined by a doctor on Monday.

*

Indians outfielder Bradley Zimmer tried his hardest to beat out a routine ground ball in the bottom of the seventh inning, diving head-first into first base, but he was ultimately called out. Zimmer was shaken up on the play and he needed attention from the team trainer to examine his hand. He initially stayed in the game but he was taken out before the top of the eighth.

Every so often, we hear about a player suffering an injury hustling to first base trying to turn an out into a hit. Sometimes, it works and the player gets a hit out of it. Sometimes, it goes really wrong and the player suffers a serious injury like a broken finger or wrist. Is the risk worth the reward? Unless it’s Game 7 of the World Series, probably not. And even then, from the player’s perspective, still probably not because he could be potentially costing himself millions of dollars and multiple years on a contract. Teams don’t like to make heavy commitments to injured/injury-prone players.

Back in 2012, then-Dodgers first base coach Davey Lopes — one of the greatest base runners of all time — said of former major leaguer Nick Punto’s propensity to dive into first base, “I wouldn’t teach it,” J.P. Hoornstra reported. John Brenkus also proved for ESPN many years ago that it’s better to run through the bag as opposed to diving.

In Zimmer’s situation, his team was in the midst of an historic 17-game winning streak (now 18) and is battling the Astros for the best record in the league. Games are very meaningful right now, so it’s understandable why he’d push his pedal to the metal. But he also recently came off of the seven-day concussion disabled list after injuring his head attempting to make a catch on Setpember 2. Is a single in a game his team was already leading 3-2 worth it compared to the Indians potentially losing him for the stretch run when the club is already missing Michael Brantley? Oftentimes, the motivations of a team is at odds with a player’s best interest, but here, the Indians very much want to keep Zimmer healthy. They would have traded that single and even the continuation of their winning streak in order to make that happen, for sure.

The blame here lies in the “hustle” culture of sports. In baseball, we publicly ostracize players who appear to take it easy on a routine grounder or pop-up and humiliate them in the very rare instance in which a fielder misplays one of those otherwise routine outs. But those who “dog it” have it right: turning the occasional ground out or fly out into a single (or, more rarely, a double) isn’t worth potentially winding up on the 10-day disabled list with a pulled hamstring, a dislocated finger, or a concussion. If I’m in the front office or the coaching staff of a baseball team, one of the first things I’m stressing early in spring training is that it is not okay to dive into first base under any circumstances unless it’s Game 7 of the World Series and the score is close.

The Indians should have more information on Zimmer’s status on Monday. In the meantime, Zimmer is very likely regretting his decision to put in some extra effort. As Allan F. Mogensen said in the 1930’s, “Work smarter, not harder.”

Yankees keep ALCS hopes alive with 4-1 win over Astros

Gio Urshela
Getty Images
7 Comments

The Yankees defeated the Astros 4-1 during Game 5 of the American League Championship Series on Friday night, staving off a potential postseason elimination and forcing the series to at least six games.

In just the third playoff appearance of his career, Yankees southpaw James Paxton turned in another impressive performance, limiting the Astros to four hits and four walks over six innings of one-run ball. According to MLB Stats, his nine strikeouts made him the second Yankees lefty to record multiple starts of 8+ strikeouts in the same postseason campaign, two decades after David Wells did so for the 1998 championship-winning club.

Paxton’s strong outing was backed by a handful of runs from DJ LeMahieu and Aaron Hicks, both of whom went deep against Astros ace Justin Verlander in the bottom of the first inning. LeMahieu’s leadoff solo shot marked his first postseason home run since Game 1 of the ALDS, while Hicks’ three-run 347-footer was his first home run of any variety since July 24 (and his first in the playoffs since the 2017 ALDS).

Neither team managed a single run after the first inning, leaving the two pitching staffs to duke it out for eight quick innings. Verlander outlasted Paxton — taking the game through the seventh with five hits, four runs, and nine strikeouts — but even with a flawless contribution from Brad Peacock in the eighth, there was little the hurlers could do to help the Astros solve Paxton and an airtight Yankees bullpen.

With the win, the Yankees will try to push the series to a full seven games in order to snatch the AL pennant from the Astros. They’ll have to do in Houston, however, as the Astros will regain home field advantage when Game 6 kicks off on Saturday at 8:08 PM EDT. Neither starter has been announced yet; per Houston skipper A.J. Hinch, it will likely be a bullpen day.