Keith Olbermann is really mad about Mark Reynolds eating sunflower seeds for some reason

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GQ’s Keith Olbermann was watching some baseball on Tuesday night, specifically the Giants-Rockies game. He observed first baseman Mark Reynolds tipping an open bag into his mouth — sunflower seeds — and tweeted about it. The Rockies zinged him pretty good in response.

Everyone had a quick laugh at his expense, and the whole thing was forgotten until Olbermann decided this was a hill upon which to die on Thursday.

There’s no rule against players eating on the field. We’ve been given great moments like this as a result:

For a long, long time, players using chewing tobacco was as much a part of the game as the crack of the bat and the smell of the grass. Sunflower seeds, too, to a lesser extent. As we learned more about the dangers of tobacco, its use waned and players started chewing gum and eating sunflower seeds more. If you ask me, that’s a good thing.

Not to Olbermann. I’m not sure I get why this is even an issue. Who is hurt by players eating sunflower seeds on the field? The salt on the seeds is bad for birds, but I doubt Olbermann is arguing from a bird’s rights perspective. And I also doubt he’s starting this crusade on the behalf of stadium workers who have to clean up discarded sunflower seed shells.

At any rate, I’m not sure the Rockies’ lack of postseason success from 2008-16 can be tied to Mark Reynolds’ on-field sunflower seed habit in 2017.

Tyler Glasnow scheduled to rejoin Rays’ rotation

Jonathan Dyer-USA TODAY Sports
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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Tampa Bay Rays right-hander Tyler Glasnow is scheduled to rejoin the rotation at Cleveland after missing nearly 14 months because of Tommy John surgery.

The Rays’ Opening Day starter last year hasn’t pitched this season after undergoing the procedure on Aug. 4, 2021.

“I think we’re pretty confident he’ll be starting for us,” Tampa Bay manager Kevin Cash said before the game with Toronto. “This is the first time he’s thrown pain-free in quite some time, so he’s encouraged by it.”

The 6-foot-8 right-hander went 5-2 with a 2.66 ERA in 14 starts last year and is a key addition as the Rays near a wild-card spot.

“Compared to the past, like, three years it feels way better as far as postday and the week leading into starts and stuff,” Glasnow said. “It’s good to have an UCL, you know.”

Cash said Glasnow will throw around 45 pitches in his initial outing, which should allow him to go two or three innings.

“Two innings of Glasnow is still a huge plus for our team,” Cash said. “Like to get three innings. If we do, great. If we don’t, that’s fine, too.”

Glasnow allowed one run, one hit, four walks and had 14 strikeouts over seven innings in four starts with Triple-A Durham.

“I’m really excited,” Glasnow said. “I’m approaching it like normal, staying on routine. Feels normal.”

Glasnow signed a two-year, $30.35 million contract that will delay the start of his free agency by one year last month. He’s making $5.1 million this year and will get $5.35 million next season and $25 million in 2024, which is the first year he would have been eligible for free agency.