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Watch: The Mariners commit five errors in one inning

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The Yankees batted around in the first inning of Sunday’s series finale against the Mariners, and boy, did they get a nice helping of runs from the Mariners’ defense. With one out and Starlin Castro hovering on second base, Gary Sanchez lined a single into left field. Left fielder Ben Gamel reached for the ball, but it deflected off of his glove and rolled out to the warning track, allowing Sanchez to reach second base and giving Castro plenty of time to score the Yankees’ first run of the afternoon.

Aaron Judge took a four-pitch walk from Andrew Albers and Didi Gregorius reached first base following another blunder from shortstop Jean Segura, loading the bases for Chase Headley. This time, former Gold Glove winner Kyle Seager tripped up, botching a catch at third base and bobbling the ball to allow Sanchez to score.

The kicker came two at-bats later, when Jacoby Ellsbury lofted a double to left-center field with two outs and the bases loaded. Aaron Judge and Didi Gregorius came home to score the Yankees’ third and fourth runs of the game, while Headley ran home after Segura dropped the cutoff throw from Gamel. Segura was also charged with a throwing error after allowing Ellsbury to reach third base.

They Yankees got in a sixth and final run on Ronald Torreyes‘ legitimate, non-error RBI single, then brought the inning to a merciful close after Hicks struck a fly ball for the third out. When the dust settled, they stood atop a 6-1 lead and the Mariners were charged with five total errors — more than any team has committed in a single inning since the Cubs imploded during a 10-3 loss to the Cardinals in 1977.

The Yankees, meanwhile, couldn’t resist an opportunity to poke a little fun at their opponent’s gaffes:

They currently lead the Mariners 8-1 in the bottom of the seventh.

The Royals are paying everyone. Why can’t all of the other teams?

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Over the past several weeks we’ve heard a lot of news about teams furloughing front office and scouting staff, leveling pay cuts for those who remain and, most recently, ceasing stipends to minor league players and releasing them en masse. The message being sent, intentionally or otherwise, is that baseball teams are feeling the pinch.

The Kansas City Royals, however, are a different story.

Jon Heyman reported this afternoon that the Royals are paying their minor leaguers through August 31, which is when the minor league season would’ve ended, and unlike so many other teams, they are not releasing players either. Jeff Passan, meanwhile, reports that the Royals will not lay any team employees off or furlough anyone. “Nearly 150 employees will not take pay cuts,” he says, though “higher-level employees will take tiered cuts.” Passan adds that the organization intends to restore the lost pay due to those higher-level employees in the future when revenue ramps back up, making them whole.

While baseball finances are murky at best and opaque in most instances, most people agree that the Royals are one of the lower-revenue franchises in the game. They are also near the bottom as far as franchise value goes. Finally, they have the newest ownership group in all of baseball, which means that the group almost certainly has a lot of debt and very little if any equity in the franchise. Any way you slice it, cashflow is likely tighter in Kansas City than almost anywhere else.

Yet the Royals are paying minor leaguers and front office employees while a great number of other teams are not. What’s their excuse?