MLB

MLB releases the personalized jerseys for “Players Weekend”

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Back in June Major League Baseball announced that August 25-27 will be “Players Weekend.”  That weekend, players will be allowed to personalize the name on the back of their jerseys and will be able to wear colored spikes, gloves and wristbands and stuff. The only rule is that MLB has to approve the names used — no F-bombs, obviously — and the colors can’t interfere with an umpire’s ability to make a call.

They just released all of the uniform designs. The basic uniforms are pullover v-necks with a solid color body and different color sleeves. You can see the front of every jersey over at MLB.com (they’re selling them, obviously, for $199 a pop). Most of them are fine enough. The Tigers one seems weird as there should be more blue and less orange or gray, but no one asked me. The Yankees script seems off. It should be an “NY.” Again, no one asked me. If you don’t want to click through, this one, which Craig Kimbrel will wear, is pretty representative:

If anyone wants to get me that one I will not object. I take a large.

The nicknames are the real draw here. If you go to this link and click on the team name along the lefthand side it will give you the jersey for every individual player.

Not all have chosen nicknames. Eleven Cardinals players simply chose their own last name as their Players Weekend name. I’m gonna assume they all submitted the most foul and shocking profanity and, once rejected, just went with their real names. A lot of guys have gone with that boring baseball convention of just adding a “Y” or “I” to their last name. Some just put their first name. Dare to dream, gentlemen. Just know that wearing the uniform is the bare minimum when it comes to flair. Some people choose to wear more.

But there are a whole lot of good ones. Like this one, worn by Kyle Seager of the Mariners:

Humor, apparently, does not run in the family:

Josh Phegley of the Athletics has my favorite one, even if it may be uncomfortable for him at some trade deadline down the road:

There’s probably a story behind Jake Marisnick‘s, but I’m not sure that I want to know it:

 

Anyway, most of these are pretty fun. It’s amazing how easy it is to have some fun in baseball if baseball simply tries.

MLB and MLBPA announce first set of COVID-19 test results

MLB COVID-19 test results
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images
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On Friday evening, Major League Baseball and the MLB Players Association announced the first set of results for COVID-19 testing as part of the mandatory intake screening process under MLB’s COVID-19 Health Monitoring & Testing Plan. Per Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle, the Athletics are not part of this data because their testing has not yet been completed.

There were 38 positive tests, accounting for 1.2% of the 3,185 samples collected and tested. 31 of the 38 individuals who tested positive are players. 19 different teams had one or more individuals test positive.

Sports Illustrated’s Emma Baccellieri notes that the positive test rate in the U.S. nationally is 8.3 percent. The NBA’s positive test rate was 7.1 percent. MLB’s positive test rate is well below average. This doesn’t necessarily mean that anything is wrong with MLB’s testing or that it’s an atypical round of testing. Rather, MLB’s testing population may more closely represent the U.S. population as a whole. Currently, because testing is still somewhat limited, those who have taken tests have tended to be those exhibiting symptoms or those who have been around others who have tested positive. If every single person in the U.S. took a test, the positive test rate would likely come in at a much lower number.

Several players who tested positive have given their consent for their identities to be made known. Those are: Delino DeShields (link), Brett Martin (link), Edward Colina, Nick Gordon, and Willians Astudillo (link). Additionally, Red Sox lefty Eduardo Rodríguez has not shown up to Red Sox camp yet because he has been around someone who tested positive, per The Athletic’s Jen McCaffrey.