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Boone Logan is unlikely to pitch again in 2017

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MLB.com’s Jordan Bastian reports that Indians’ lefty reliever Boone Logan has been shut down from throwing and could miss the remainder of the 2017 season. He sustained a left lat strain during an outing against the Giants last month and was transferred to the 60-day disabled list on July 29. While he decided against surgery, the parameters of his recovery period are still unknown.

Logan, 32, was sidelined during his first run with the Indians after signing a one-year, $5.5 million contract with the club in February. The contract includes a $7 million option or $1 million buyout for the 2018 season. Prior to his injury, Logan worked as a lefty specialist behind team closer and fellow left-hander Andrew Miller, compiling a 4.71 ERA in 38 appearances and racking up a 3.9 BB/9 and career-best 12.0 SO/9 through 21 innings.

The Indians addressed their need for bullpen depth in the days leading up to the trade deadline, claiming right-handed reliever Diego Moreno off waivers and adding righty Joe Smith in a trade with the Blue Jays. Left-hander Craig Breslow was signed to a minor league contract earlier today, and should bolster the team’s relief corps with both Logan and Miller taking an indefinite hiatus on the disabled list.

Nationals back off of minor league stipend cut

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Yesterday it was reported that the Washington Nationals would cut the weekly stipend paid to their minor leaguers from $400 a week to $300 per week through the end of June.

For frame of reference, MLB had agreed to pay all minor leaguers $400 per week through May 31. Several teams have agreed to extend that, with the Royals and Twins agreeing to do it all the way through the end of August. The Oakland A’s decided to stop the payments in their entirety as of today. The Nationals were unique in cutting $100 off of the checks.

The A’s and the Nationals have taken a great amount of flak for what they’ve done. The Nats move was immediately countered by Nationals major league players announcing that they would cover what the organization would not.

The A’s are, apparently, still sticking to their plan. The Nats, however, have reversed course:

One can easily imagine a situation in which Nats ownership just decided, cold-heartedly, to lop that hundred bucks off of each minor league check and not worry about a moment longer. What’s harder to imagine is what seems to have actually happened: the Nats did it without realizing that anyone would take issue with it, were surprised by the blowback, and then reversed course. Like, what kind of a bubble where they living in that they did not think people would consider that a low-rent thing to do?

In any event, good move, Nats, even if I cannot even begin to comprehend your thought process.