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Video: Ryan Braun makes franchise history with his sixth career grand slam

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Ryan Braun launched into the second half of the season with his sixth career grand slam on Friday night, setting a new franchise record in the process. It was his first slam since 2015, putting him just ahead of former Brewers Jeromy Burnitz, Cecil Cooper and John Jaha, who previously shared a four-way tie with Braun for the most grand slams in club history.

The blast capped a monster of an inning for the Brewers, who stockpiled eight runs in the second as they took the lead and then some. With the bases loaded and one out against Phillies right-hander Nick Pivetta, Braun unloaded a first-pitch, 400-foot home run to dead center field to give the Brewers an 8-2 lead:

Braun entered Friday’s series opener with 10 home runs and a respectable, if underwhelming .259/.342/.545 batting line through 161 PA. The grand slam certainly helps, though he still has a ways to go to match the .305 average and 30 homers he produced for the club in 2016.

The run support proved crucial for Milwaukee starter Zach Davies, who handed Philadelphia another four runs in the fifth and sixth innings with a two-RBI single from Maikel Franco and a two-run homer from Odubel Herrera. The Brewers currently lead the Phillies, 9-6, in the bottom of the sixth.

Report: David Price to pay each Dodgers minor leaguer $1,000 out of his own pocket

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Francys Romero reports that, according to his sources, Dodgers pitcher David Price will pay $1,000 out of his own money to each Dodgers minor leaguer who is not on the 40-man roster during the month of June.

That’s a pretty amazing gesture from Price. It’s also extraordinarily telling that such a gesture is even necessary.

Under a March agreement with Major League Baseball, minor leaguers have been receiving financial assistance that is set to expire at the end of May. Baseball America reported earlier this week that the Dodgers will continue to pay their minor leaguers $400 per week past May 31, but it is unclear how long such payments would go. Even if one were to assume that the payments will continue throughout the month of June, however, it’s worth noting that $400 a week is not a substantial amount of money for players to live on, on which to support families, and on which to train and remain ready to play baseball if and when they are asked to return.

Price’s generosity should be lauded here, but this should not be considered a feel-good story overall. Major League Baseball, which has always woefully underpaid its minor leaguers has left them in a vulnerable position once again.