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The Marlins lawsuits against season ticket holders continue apace

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Last year we passed along a story from the Miami New Times about the Miami Marlins’ pattern of suing their season ticket holders. As of that writing the Marlins had initiated litigation against at least nine of them, accusing them of reneging on multi-season ticket commitments. The ticket holders, for their part, typically argued that the Marlins did not fulfill promises to deliver certain amenities like private parking and post-game buffets.

At the time we noted that while the Marlins may have been within their rights to sue over broken contracts, it was unusual for a team to sue their ticket holders. It’s bad P.R. for one thing. For another, it seemed shortsighted in that some sort of customer service solution — Player meet-and-greets? Merch? on-field access? — may have caused the ticket holders to recommit and continue to fill the Marlins’ coffers. Did the Marlins have to do that? No, not if they had an enforceable contract, but it seemed like a better solution.

Fast-forward a year and we see that, no, settling these things amicably was not to be. That’s especially true with respect to one former season ticket holder who is having some commercial property foreclosed on by the Marlins to satisfy their judgment. From the New Times:

Loria’s team is suing a fan named Kenneth Sack in Broward County Courts to seize a $725,000 building he owns in Oakland Park — all as part of the same ugly dispute that has led the team to sue at least nine season ticket holders and luxury suite owners since 2003 . . . Sack signed a four-year contract for season tickets in 2012 at $16,200 per ticket for a total price of $129,6000. Sack, who lives in Colorado but has a home in Palm Beach, paid the full $32,400 for the first season but then wanted to walk away. The team sued him in December 2014 for the remaining $97,200.

Now, before you get the pitchforks out for Jeff Loria, it’s worth acknowledging that Mr. Sack here appears to be a sophisticated businessman who owns commercial property and who splits time between Miami and Colorado. And, of course, he is able to devote $129K to baseball tickets at the drop of a hat. He’s not a poor family being put out on the street.

It also seems that the Marlins got this judgment by default, with Sack missing hearings and deadlines and things. Sack’s lawyers say it’s because he had a heart attack, but without meaning to sound callous, legitimate health problems are always going to entitle you to get a civil case like this put on hold. At least if you take the minimum basic steps to inform the court that you need a delay. Seems that Sack didn’t do that and now the Marlins are doing what they’re allowed to do to execute their judgment.

Still, I can’t shake the notion that the Marlins seem to be the only team that so enthusiastically pursues litigation like this. I suspect a lot of it has to do with the fact that most teams don’t worry too much about a season ticket holder walking away from a commitment, secure in the knowledge that someone else will step up to take their place. The Marlins, in contrast, probably don’t have a huge demand, largely by virtue of decisions its ownership has made over the years. There’s also the fact that Jeff Loria is not exactly a guy who has demonstrated much concern for his fans wherever he’s done business. If there’s a hostile way to solve a problem, by gum, he’ll take it.

It strikes me that, rather than litigation, some other sort of resolution could’ve been achieved here. It also strikes me that, once the Marlins are finally sold, everyone will be much, much happier.

 

Brewers reliever Josh Hader in hot water over racist, homophobic tweets from 2011-12

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Brewers reliever Josh Hader didn’t have a good night. He gave up four hits and a three-run homer to put the National League in a big hole in the All-Star Game. That’s the kind of thing that has to stick with you.

Oh, and he was also revealed to be a SUPER BIG racist, misogynist and homophobe. That’s gonna stick with him too, and may land him in trouble with Major League Baseball.

Someone decided to dig through Hader’s Twitter history this evening and when they did they found some ugly, ugly stuff in there from back in 2011-12.* Hader was found to have used the n-word, liberally. He said “I hate gay people.” He said some super misogynistic stuff about wanting a woman who will cook and clean for him, among other pretty damn vile things. There were multiple references to cocaine. He said “I’ll murder your family” to one person and made some total non-sequitur tweet simply saying “KKK.” You name a social media etiquette line that one can cross and Hader not only crossed it, but he totally and gleefully trampled over. If you want to see that vile stuff you can see it over at The Big Lead, which screen-capped it. I presume Hader has deleted them by now.

The news of Hader’s old, unearthed tweets bubbled out as the All-Star Game was going on, and reporters met Hader in the locker room right afterward for comment. Hader owned up to them — there was no “I was hacked” excuses offered here — saying that the tweets were a sign of immaturity when he was 17 years-old. He said he plans to apologize to his teammates, saying they don’t reflect on him as a person now. His quote: “No excuses. I was dumb and stupid.” Which, well, yes, obviously.

That may not be the end of it, however:

These tweets are old, Hader may be a different person now and people can do a lot of growing up between 17 and 24. But Major League Baseball is not happy tonight, I can assure you, that an ugly social media incident blew up during its biggest showcase of the regular season.

Will Hader be disciplined? Hard to say, given that Hader wasn’t even drafted yet when those tweets were made and given that MLB’s social media policy was not even in place then. But it would not shock me at all if more comes of this than Hader merely apologizing to his teammates. Stay tuned.

*There are several putative Hader tweets floating around Twitter right now of a more recent vintage. Hader has locked his account, however, and they cannot be confirmed, and many people who were able to access his account before it was locked said those tweets were not there before, with the suggestion that they were Photoshopped. We are neither in the position to — nor do we have the inclination to — verify which of Hader’s tweets are legitimate and which are fabricated. We know, however, that there is more than ample, awful stuff that he has owned up to and we’ll leave it at that for now.