Anthony Rizzo’s slide wasn’t “dirty,” but it did violate Rule 7.13

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In case you missed it last night, controversy erupted during and after the Cubs victory over the San Diego Padres in Chicago. The source of controversy: this sixth inning play at the plate in which Anthony Rizzo attempted to score on a fly ball to center field. Matt Szczur made the catch and fired home to catcher Austin Hedges, who held on to tag Rizzo for the double play. But the collision still has people talking:

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Hedges left the game with a bruised thigh. Everyone else involved has bruised feelings.

The issue, obviously, is whether the collision was legal under the rules. The rule in question is 7.13, which holds thusly:

(1) A runner attempting to score may not deviate from his direct pathway to the plate in order to initiate contact with the catcher (or other player covering home plate).  If, in the judgment of the Umpire, a runner attempting to score initiates contact with the catcher (or other player covering home plate) in such a manner, the Umpire shall declare the runner out (even if the player covering home plate loses possession of the ball).  In such circumstances, the Umpire shall call the ball dead, and all other base runners shall return to the last base touched at the time of the collision.

As is always the case in the rules, the official comment provides illumination:

Rule 7.13 Comment: The failure by the runner to make an effort to touch the plate, the runner’s lowering of the shoulder, or the runner’s pushing through with his hands, elbows or arms, would support a determination that the runner deviated from the pathway in order to initiate contact with the catcher in violation of Rule 7.13.  If the runner slides into the plate in an appropriate manner, he shall not be adjudged to have violated Rule 7.13.  A slide shall be deemed appropriate, in the case of a feet first slide, if the runner’s buttocks and legs should hit the ground before contact with the catcher.  In the case of a head first slide, a runner shall be deemed to have slid appropriately if his body should hit the ground before contact with the catcher.

Based on the replay, it does not seem that Rizzo deviated his path. He took an inside-the-line path for several feet before getting close to Hedges. However, he did not appear to make any effort to touch the plate nor did he make an effort to “slide into the plate in an appropriate manner.” That based on neither his legs nor his butt hitting the dirt first. He really just tried to cross body block Hedges because he knew the ball was beating him home and that Hedges was in a good position to tag him out, which of course he did.

While Rizzo was under no duty to go for the back of the plate here, it’s worth noting that he obviously had a path to it and could’ve taken it if he wanted to. While not required to do so, his not doing so could have certainly informed the umpire’s judgment, as the rule requires the ump to exercise, if he was forced to make a ruling on whether Rizzo did, in fact, violate the rule. Since Hedges held on to the ball, of course, the point was moot. He was out either way.

Not that that ends things. Major League Baseball could, if it wished, discipline Rizzo for the slide. Padres manager Andy Green certainly seemed to be advocating for that after the game, calling Rizzo’s slide “fairly egregious,” “disheartening,” and “a cheap shot.”

Not surprisingly, Rizzo and Joe Maddon did not believe it to be a bad slide. Here’s Rizzo:

“It’s one of those plays where it’s very sensitive. It’s a play where I’m out by two steps. If I slide, he runs into me. I’ve talked to a lot of umpires about this rule. It’s my understanding if they have the ball, it’s game on.”

Maddon:

“You don’t see it anymore because the runner thinks he has to avoid (the catcher) — he doesn’t. If the guy’s in the way, you’re still able to hit him. I’d much prefer what Riz did tonight. What he did was right, absolutely right. There’s nothing wrong with that and nobody can tell me differently.”

Rizzo is dead wrong about the “if the catcher has the ball, it’s game on” thing. That is not any part of the rule, as stated above. Maddon is right about the runner not having to avoid the catcher, but he’s ignoring the part about the runner’s need to actually try to touch the plate and not initiate contact.

Do I think the play was “dirty” or a “cheap shot” like Green says? No. I don’t think Rizzo had any intent to hurt Hedges. I don’t think he was twirling his mustache while running down the line, savoring the chance to be dastardly. I think that 20 years of playing baseball and instinct took over and that it was a stronger force in Rizzo’s head and muscles than a three-year-old rule, which is understandable.

But I do think the slide was technically in violation of the rule and that, if it chooses to, MLB could discipline Rizzo for it.

Brown hired as general manager of Houston Astros

astros general manager
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HOUSTON — In joining the World Series champion Houston Astros, new general manager Dana Brown’s goal is to keep the team at the top of the league.

“I’m coming to a winning team and a big part of what I want to do is sustain the winning long term,” he said. “We want to continue to build, continue to sign good players, continue to develop players and continue the winning success.”

Brown was hired by the Astros on Thursday, replacing James Click, who was not given a new contract and parted ways with the Astros just days after they won the World Series.

Brown spent the last four seasons as the vice president of scouting for the Atlanta Braves.

“He is very analytic savvy,” Astros’ owner Jim Crane said. “He’s a great talent evaluator based upon what we’ve seen at the Braves, seasoned at player acquisitions, seasoned at player development and retention. They were often able to extend some of their player contracts… he’s got great people skills, excellent communicator and, last but not least, he’s a baseball player and knows baseball in and out and we were very impressed with that.”

The 55-year-old Brown becomes the only Black general manager in the majors and joins manager Dusty Baker to form just the second pairing of a Black manager and general manager in MLB history. The first was general manager Ken Williams and manager Jerry Manuel with the White Sox.

Brown said he interviewed for GM jobs with the Mets and Mariners in the past and that MLB commissioner Rob Manfred told him to stay positive and that his time to be a general manager would come.

“It’s pretty special,” he said. “We understand that there are a lot of qualified African Americans in the game that know baseball and that could be a big part of an organization and leading organization in baseball operations. So at the end of the day, I think it’s good for our sport to have diversity and I’m really excited for this opportunity.”

Crane was asked about having the league’s only Black general manager.

“Certainly, we are very focused on diversity with the Astros,” he said. “It’s a plus, but the guy’s extremely qualified and he’ll do a great job. It’s nice to see a man like Dana get the job and he earned the job. He’s got the qualifications. He’s ready to go.”

Brown doesn’t have a lot of connections to the Astros, but does have some ties. He played baseball at Seton Hall with Hall of Famer Craig Biggio, who spent his entire career with the Astros and serves as special assistant to the general manager. He played against fellow Hall of Famer and special assistant to the general manager Jeff Bagwell in the Cape Cod league during a short minor league career.

Brown said he spoke to both of them before taking the job and also chatted with Baker, whom he’s know for some time.

“Dusty is old school, he cuts it straight and I like it,” Brown said. “And so that means I can cut it straight with him.”

Brown worked for the Blue Jays from 2010-18 as a special assistant to the general manager. From 2001-09 he worked as director of scouting for the Nationals/Expos. He began his career with the Pittsburgh Pirates, where he spent eight years as their area scouting supervisor and East coast cross checker.

Click had served as Houston’s general manager since joining the team before the 2020 season from the Tampa Bay Rays.

Brown, who has been part of drafting a number of big-name players like Stephen Strasburg, Ryan Zimmerman and last season’s National League rookie of the year Michael Harris, is ready to show Crane that bringing him to Houston was the right choice.

“Baseball is all I know, it’s my entire life,” he said. “So I want to empty myself into this city, the Astro fans and let Jim Crane know that he made a special pick.”