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Jason Heyward exits game with left hand abrasion

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Cubs’ right fielder Jason Heyward left Sunday’s game with a left hand abrasion, according to MLB.com’s Carrie Muskat. Heyward was injured in the second inning while making a sliding catch on the warning track, and underwent treatment on his wrist before taking the field again in the third. He left the game after his final at-bat in the bottom of the third inning and was replaced by Kyle Schwarber, who took over in left field while Jon Jay shifted to right. The club has yet to release a timetable for Heyward’s return.

Heyward, 27, went 0-for-2 against the Pirates’ Jameson Taillon during the series finale. Entering Sunday, he carried a .260/.318/.403 batting line with six home runs and a .721 OPS through his first 215 PA. He recently recovered from a sprained finger on his right hand, which he suffered while diving for another ball during a game against the Yankees last month.

The Cubs currently lead the Pirates 7-1 in the bottom of the ninth inning. Schwarber went 1-for-3 at the plate, collecting his tenth double of the year off of Wade LeBlanc in the seventh.

Report: David Price to pay each Dodgers minor leaguer $1,000 out of his own pocket

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Francys Romero reports that, according to his sources, Dodgers pitcher David Price will pay $1,000 out of his own money to each Dodgers minor leaguer who is not on the 40-man roster during the month of June.

That’s a pretty amazing gesture from Price. It’s also extraordinarily telling that such a gesture is even necessary.

Under a March agreement with Major League Baseball, minor leaguers have been receiving financial assistance that is set to expire at the end of May. Baseball America reported earlier this week that the Dodgers will continue to pay their minor leaguers $400 per week past May 31, but it is unclear how long such payments would go. Even if one were to assume that the payments will continue throughout the month of June, however, it’s worth noting that $400 a week is not a substantial amount of money for players to live on, on which to support families, and on which to train and remain ready to play baseball if and when they are asked to return.

Price’s generosity should be lauded here, but this should not be considered a feel-good story overall. Major League Baseball, which has always woefully underpaid its minor leaguers has left them in a vulnerable position once again.