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Mike Schmidt makes public statement regarding the Odubel Herrera controversy

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Earlier, Craig wrote about Phillies broadcaster Mike Schmidt criticizing outfielder Odubel Herrera, saying that the 2016 All-Star can’t be a team leader because of the “language barrier.” Understandably, Schmidt received criticism for his comment, made during an appearance on local sports radio.

Schmidt called Herrera personally to apologize, MLB.com’s Todd Zolecki reports. And Schmidt made a statement to the public, as CSN Philly’s John Clark reports:

It’s been made known to me that my answer on a radio interview this morning to the question, “can the Phillies build a team around Odubel Herrera” was disrespectful to Herrera and Latin players in general. I’m very sorry that his misrepresentation of my answer occurred and may have offended someone. I assure everyone I had no intention of that. Odubel is a dynamo on the field, and as he becomes more comfortable with the language, his leadership skills will improve, and no doubt he will be a centerpiece in the Phillies future.

This is not exactly an example of a good apology. Schmidt starts off with, “It’s been made known to me,” which shows us that he still doesn’t see the issue with what he said; rather, he’s going by other people’s reactions to it. A good apology would include recognition of the issue and accepting responsibility.

Schmidt wasn’t taken out of context, either. He was asked if Herrera was a player the Phillies could build around, and the outfielder’s ability — or perceived lack thereof — to communicate was an important factor to Schmidt.

Later, he refers to the blowback as a “misrepresentation of my answer,” which shifts blame from him saying something problematic to other people. Schmidt then says that that misrepresentation “may have offended someone.” So not only are other people at fault for misinterpreting what he said, but they’re also wrong for being offended by it.

Lastly, Schmidt says that Herrera’s leadership will improve “as he becomes more comfortable with the language,” which is basically restating what he said on the radio that got him into trouble in the first place. While Herrera isn’t 100 percent fluent in English, he speaks enough of it to get by, just like thousands of other players who have played the sport. Some of those, like David Ortiz and Adrian Beltre, have become the leaders of their teams. One need not have English as a first language to become a leader.

Clark also reported Herrera’s response. “I don’t agree with his comments. It’s disappointing,” Herrera said.

Max Scherzer, with broken nose, strikes out 10 Phillies over seven shutout innings

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Nationals starter Max Scherzer bunted a ball into his face during batting practice on Tuesday, breaking his nose in the process. He ended up with a gnarly looking shiner around his right eye, making him appear a bit like Terminator. Scherzer still took the ball to start the second game of Wednesday night’s doubleheader against the Phillies.

Despite the injury, Scherzer was incredibly effective, limiting the Phillies to four hits and two walks across seven shutout innings, striking out 10 batters in the process. He might even have had some extra adrenaline going, as he averaged 96.2 MPH on his fastball, his highest average fastball velocity in a game since September 2012, per MLB.com’s Jamal Collier. The Nationals provided Scherzer with just one run of support, coming on a Brian Dozier solo home run off of Jake Arrieta in the second inning, but it was enough.

Wander Suero worked a scoreless top of the eighth with a pair of strikeouts. Victor Robles added a solo homer off of Pat Neshek in the bottom half. Closer Sean Doolittle took over in the ninth, working a 1-2-3 frame to give the Nats their 2-0 victory.

Over his last six starts, Scherzer now has a 0.88 ERA with a 59/8 K/BB ratio across 41 innings. He has gone six innings, struck out at least nine batters, and held the opposition to two or fewer runs in each of those six starts.