The New York Post reports Matt Harvey was out drinking until 4am Saturday morning

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This report comes from the New York Post’s Page 6. That’s a gossip page, so give it whatever weight you feel is appropriate, but we should probably acknowledge that this is the sort of story where gossipy reporting is more likely to tease out the truth than official statements and on-the-record quotes.

Anyway: the Post reports that Matt Harvey‘s suspension-inspiring Saturday absence from Citi Field was preceded by a Friday night of Cinco de Mayo partying. Specifically, the Post has a source in a club that says Harvey and his boys showed up at 1am, ordered a bunch of champagne, tequila and vodka while sitting at a private table and stayed until 4am.

Harvey’s story is that he played golf Saturday morning, had a nice lunch, took a nap and then texted in sick with a migraine that afternoon. The Mets, it seems, weren’t buying that, and sent some goons to go figure out what, exactly, Harvey was up to. I have no idea what Harvey was really doing, but even if he went straight home after the club I’m struggling to see anyone hitting the links for a morning of golf after doin’ bottle service until the wee hours of the morning. But what do I know? I’m not a professional athlete.

On one level, eh, Mickey Mantle did this stuff  back in his day, only with bottles of Cutty in bars instead of Armand de Brignac Champagne at clubs. Another difference then was no one was telling tabloids about it or, if they were, the tabloids weren’t writing about it because it was a different time. A more significant difference then was that, for the most part, Mantle showed up at the park the next day, for better or for worse, and likely didn’t tell his team stories about it all that they didn’t believe like Harvey apparently did. Oh, and he was Mickey Frickin’ Mantle, not a guy more than two seasons removed from his last bit of effectiveness and a 5.14 ERA.

Whatever the case, Harvey’s suspension ends today and he’ll pitch for the Mets later this week. If he pitches well and shows up on time from now on, this will all be forgotten soon. If he struggles or if these problems continue, it’ll be a story that never goes away.

For what it’s worth, my biggest takeaway is confusion at how, in the age of social media and gossip and stuff, a very famous person can go to a club and not expect someone to say that they saw him there. But go with that “I was out golfing and had a migraine” story, Matt.

Jeffrey Springs, Rays agree to $31 million, 4-year contract

Bob DeChiara-USA TODAY Sports
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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. – Left-hander Jeffrey Springs became the first of the 33 players who exchanged proposed arbitration salaries with their teams to reach a deal, agreeing Wednesday to a $31 million, four-year contract with the Tampa Bay Rays that could be worth $65.75 million over five seasons.

The 30-year old was among seven Rays who swapped arbitration figures with the team on Jan. 13. He began last season in the bullpen, transitioned to the starting rotation in May and finished 9-5 with a 2.46 ERA in 33 appearances, including 25 starts. He is 14-6 with a 2.70 ERA in 76 outings – 51 of them in relief – since he was acquired from Boston in February 2021.

Springs gets $4 million this year, $5.25 million in 2024 and $10.5 million in each of the following two seasons. Tampa Bay has a $15 million option for 2027 with a $750,000 buyout.

The 2025 and 2026 salaries can escalate by up to $3.75 million each based on innings in 2023-24 combined: $1.5 million for 300, $1 million for 325, $750,000 for 350 and $500,000 for 375. The `25 and ’26 salaries also can escalate based on finish in Cy Young Award voting in `23 and ’24: $2 million for winning, $1.5 million for finishing second through fifth in the voting and $250,000 for finishing sixth through 10th.

Tampa Bay’s option price could escalate based on Cy Young voting in 2025 and 2026: by $2.5 million for winning, $2 million for finishing second through fifth and $500,000 for sixth through 10th.

Springs would get $45.25 million if the option is exercised, $52.75 million with the option and meeting all innings targets and the maximum if he meetings the innings targets and wins two Cy Youngs.

Springs’ ERA last season was the second lowest in franchise history for a pitcher working a minimum of 100 innings. Former Rays ace Blake Snell compiled 1.89 ERA on the way to winning the 2018 AL Cy Young.

In addition to finishing sixth in the AL in ERA, Springs allowed three runs or fewer in 22 of 25 starts and two runs or fewer 17 times. He joined Tampa Bay’s rotation on May 9, gradually increasing his workload over his next six appearances. Springs was 6-3 with a 2.40 ERA in 14 starts after the All-Star break.

Arbitration hearings start next week and the Rays remain with the most players scheduled to appear before three-person panels.

Springs had asked for a raise from $947,500 to $3.55 million and had been offered $2.7 million. Tampa remains scheduled for hearings with right-handers Jason Adam, Pete Fairbanks and Ryan Thompson, left-hander Colin Poche, third baseman Yandy Diaz and outfielder Harold Ramirez.

Tampa Bay also agreed minor league contacts with catcher Gavin Collins and right-hander Jaime Schultz, who will report to major league spring training.

Infielder Austin Shenton and pitchers Anthony Molina and Joe LaSorsa also were invited to big league spring training.