The Red Sox ran into the least exciting triple play in living memory

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There are many different kinds of triple plays.

The most exciting triple play is the quick-as-fire around-the-horn number, with a third baseman and a second baseman firing off the ball like their lives depend upon it: “5! 4! 3! They turned three!”

Those bear multiple replays and should be featured on highlight shows.

Down the list from that a bit are the ones where one player — usually a shortstop — drives the action, maybe catching a hot shot on a leap, coming down and touching the bag and then running down the guy who left first base and who couldn’t get his brain around what the hell was going on until the shortstop already tagged him. Those are fun too. Individual showcases.

After that there are, say, a half dozen other triple plays, then there’s fifty feet of crap, and then there’s this one the Red Sox just ran themselves into against the Orioles in the bottom of the eighth inning of tonight’s game. Watch:

Yep: a dropped pop fly + brain dead runners and that’s about it.

It doesn’t matter much as the Sox beat the Orioles 5-2. And because, hey, three outs are three outs. But at least we now have a baseline for triple plays.

Report: David Price to pay each Dodgers minor leaguer $1,000 out of his own pocket

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Francys Romero reports that, according to his sources, Dodgers pitcher David Price will pay $1,000 out of his own money to each Dodgers minor leaguer who is not on the 40-man roster during the month of June.

That’s a pretty amazing gesture from Price. It’s also extraordinarily telling that such a gesture is even necessary.

Under a March agreement with Major League Baseball, minor leaguers have been receiving financial assistance that is set to expire at the end of May. Baseball America reported earlier this week that the Dodgers will continue to pay their minor leaguers $400 per week past May 31, but it is unclear how long such payments would go. Even if one were to assume that the payments will continue throughout the month of June, however, it’s worth noting that $400 a week is not a substantial amount of money for players to live on, on which to support families, and on which to train and remain ready to play baseball if and when they are asked to return.

Price’s generosity should be lauded here, but this should not be considered a feel-good story overall. Major League Baseball, which has always woefully underpaid its minor leaguers has left them in a vulnerable position once again.