Freddy Galvis happy with Phillies’ decision to extend protective netting

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Last summer, Phillies shortstop Freddy Galvis lined a foul ball into the stands and unfortunately struck and injured a young girl. After the game, Galvis pleaded for the Phillies to extend the protective netting further down the first and third base lines. The next day, another fan was struck in nearly the same area and Galvis — in the field this time — threw his hands up in frustration.

During the offseason, the Phillies did heed the advice of their shortstop, extending the netting to the far ends of both the home and visitors’ dugouts.

Two weeks into the regular season, Galvis is happy, MLB.com’s Todd Zolecki reports. Galvis said, “A little bit over the dugout and I think more people are going to be safe. The last couple of days, I think I saw like one guy get hit on the other side [of the netting]. But this is a good start. Let’s see what it brings and go from there.”

Galvis added, “I don’t know if it was because I said something, but at the point right now I feel good, because people come here with their families and they’re protected right now, especially young kids. I think right now there’s more safety. You hit one into the net, OK, that’s over. We have the net right there and you can keep your focus on the game.”

Around this time last year, Craig noted that the players in particular seem to be very much in favor of extending the protective netting.

Zolecki reports that the Phillies invited season-ticket holders with seats behind the dugout to take a look at the field from behind the extended netting. Of the 175 people to show up, none cancelled their season tickets and only 10 asked to have their seats relocated.

Mike Stiles, Phillies executive VP and COO, said, “Since we started playing, we’ve had no complaints. The comments that we’re getting right now is, ‘It’s not interfering with our ability to watch the game,’ and ‘We appreciate being behind the netting.'”

Stiles continued, “Our players have been good about flipping balls lightly over the netting so they’re still getting some foul balls. It’s been a very positive experience. It was the right move, and I think we did it the right way giving people an opportunity to come look. If they wanted to move, they could.”

Orioles CEO, brother agree to dismiss legal dispute

Tommy Gilligan-USA TODAY Sports
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Baltimore Orioles CEO John Angelos and his brother Lou have agreed to end their fight over a lawsuit in which Lou accused John of seizing control of the team in defiance of their father Peter’s wishes.

Lou Angelos sued John last year, claiming John took control of the Orioles at his expense. Georgia Angelos, their mother, also was named as a defendant.

In a Friday court filing in the case, John, Lou, Georgia and Peter Angelos called on “all claims, including all counterclaims and defenses, asserted therein be dismissed with prejudice in their entirety.”

“The Parties also withdraw and terminate all pending motions submitted in these actions,” the filing said.

Peter Angelos became the Orioles’ owner in 1993, but his public role has diminished in recent years and he turned 93 last year. According to the suit, he had surgery after his aortic valve failed in 2017.

Lou Angelos accused John of trying to take control of Peter Angelos’ assets and manipulating Georgia Angelos. The lawsuit was one of a handful of off-field issues looming over the Orioles this offseason. The team also has a lease at Camden Yards that expires at the end of the year.