An angry Mets fan is going viral

NBC New York
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On Monday, a Mets fan from New Jersey named Frank Fleming had tickets for the Opening Day game between the Braves and Mets. The only problem: his train from New Jersey was delayed due to a derailment. Fleming assessed the situation calmly and calculated that, oh dear, he may not make his scheduled appointment with the hometown nine!

Kidding. He flew off the handle and went into a berserker-like rage. It was picked up by local news and quickly went viral.

 

Fleming ended up missing the first pitch, but he did make the game in the first inning, so the saga had a happy ending.

Haha, I’m just kidding. This is the early 21st century, and stories never end. They just become commercialized. To that end, Excedrin got into the act, riding Fleming’s headache inducing rage to some inexpensive marketing.

I was sent this quote by a publicist, so don’t think for a minute that Madison Avenue is not on top of its game:

Excedrin saw Frank Fleming’s opening day headache video and felt his pain,” said Scott Yacovino, Senior Brand Manager Excedrin. “We’re giving Frank tickets to Friday night’s game, a private car and some Excedrin just in case his opening day headache remains. While we can’t guarantee a victory, we can guarantee he won’t have another headache trying to get there.”

For his part, Fleming may have some anger management issues, but he’s savvy enough to get in on the marketing:

“I was bummed out that I missed the Opening Day ceremonies, but luckily my new friends at Excedrin relieved my headache with tickets for Friday night’s game behind the dugout and a driver to make sure I get there.”

Like Andy Warhol said: “In the future, everyone will have their genuine emotion coopted by brands for 15 minutes.”

No lease extension, but Orioles and governor tout partnership

orioles camden yards
Daniel Shirey/Getty Images
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The Baltimore Orioles and Maryland Gov. Wes Moore announced a joint commitment to what they called a “multi-decade, public-private partnership” to revitalize the Camden Yards sports complex.

The statement from the team and the state’s new governor came Wednesday, the deadline for the Orioles to exercise a one-time, five-year extension to their lease at Camden Yards. The team was not planning to exercise that option, according to a person with knowledge of the decision. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the club hadn’t announced its decision.

With no extension, the lease is set to expire at the end of this year, but the team and the Maryland Stadium Authority can keep negotiating. Wednesday’s joint release seemed to be an attempt to calm any nerves in Baltimore about the team’s future.

“I am looking forward to continuing to collaborate with Governor Moore, his administration, and the Maryland Stadium Authority in order to bring to Baltimore the modern, sustainable, and electrifying sports and entertainment destination the state of Maryland deserves,” Orioles CEO John Angelos said.

“We greatly appreciate Governor Moore’s vision and commitment as we seize the tremendous opportunity to redefine the paradigm of what a Major League Baseball venue represents and thereby revitalize downtown Baltimore. It is my hope and expectation that, together with Governor Moore and the new members and new chairman of the MSA board, we can again fully realize the potential of Camden Yards to serve as a catalyst for Baltimore’s second renaissance.”

Republican Larry Hogan, the state’s previous governor, signed a bill last year increasing bond authorization for M&T Bank Stadium, home of the Baltimore Ravens, and Camden Yards. The measure allowed borrowing of up to $600 million for each stadium.

“When Camden Yards opened 30 years ago, the Baltimore Orioles revolutionized baseball and set the bar for the fan experience,” Moore, a Democrat, said Wednesday. “We share the commitment of the Orioles organization to ensuring that the team is playing in a world-class facility at Camden Yards for decades to come and are excited to advance our public-private partnership.”

Angelos recently reaffirmed that the Orioles would stay in Baltimore, although he dressed down a reporter who asked for more clarity on the future of the team’s ownership situation. Angelos was sued last year by his brother Lou, who claimed John Angelos seized control of the Orioles at his expense.