Tyler Cravy might seek “a 9 to 5 job where I get treated like a human, at this point.”

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Brewers reliever Tyler Cravy wasn’t happy when he received the news that he and bullpen mate Rob Scahill did not make the team’s 25-man roster to open the regular season. Both will start with Triple-A Colorado Springs. That is, if Cravy doesn’t seek employment in a completely new field.

Per Tom Haudricourt of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Cravy says he might seek “a 9 to 5 job where I get treated like a human, at this point.” He added, “It would just be nice to have the honesty straight up front instead of, ‘Hey, you’re competing for a job,’ then literally out-compete everyone and be told, ‘Sorry, we have other plans.'” Scahill doesn’t see the Brewers releasing him, rather, “I think it would just be me deciding to quit if I chose that route. I’m just not sure I want to play for guys who treat you like this.”

Scahill isn’t happy, either. He thinks his status as a non-roster invitee worked against him in his quest to make the roster. He said, “I would assume that it did (work against me). But, again, that’s not my call. I felt like I pitched well enough to win a job, but they’re going in a different direction.” Scahill continued, “I’m not the one who makes the decisions. I’m not happy but it’s part of the game. I understand that but it doesn’t make it any easier.”

Both pitchers performed admirably this spring. Cravy pitched 13 1/3 innings, yielding only three runs on five hits and three walks with 11 strikeouts. Scahill logged 12 1/3 innings, giving up just one run on nine hits and a walk with eight strikeouts.

It’s easy to write off Cravy and Scahill’s frustration, but it’s understandable. Among Brewers pitchers to rack up double-digit innings in spring training, Wily Peralta — whose roster spot was already guaranteed — was the only one with a spring ERA in the same neighborhood at 0.71. Despite pitching much better than could have been reasonably expected, both are now faced with the prospect of lower pay, long bus rides instead of plane trips, and motels instead of hotels in the minor leagues.

GM David Stearns empathized with Cravy and Scahill. He said, “Our job is to manage the organization the best we can to get as many wins as possible as we can. I understand players are going to be emotional. I certainly understand players are disappointed when they performed well and aren’t immediately rewarded for that performance. It happens a lot in this industry. It’s one of the more challenging parts of this industry when players perform well and there’s not that immediate reward. So, I certainly understand that disappointment.”

Bogaerts reportedly heading to the Padres for 11 years, $280 million

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SAN DIEGO — The San Diego Padres and Xander Bogaerts agreed to a blockbuster 11-year, $280 million contract, adding the All-Star slugger to an already deep lineup.

A person familiar with the negotiations confirmed the contract to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because it was pending a physical.

The Padres already had Fernando Tatis Jr. at shortstop, but he missed the entire season because of injuries and an 80-game suspension for testing positive for a performance-enhancing drug.

San Diego also met with Aaron Judge and Trea Turner before the big stars opted for different teams. The Padres reached the NL Championship Series this year before losing to the Phillies.

“From our standpoint, you want to explore and make sure we’re looking at every possible opportunity to get better,” general manager A.J. Preller said before the Bogaerts deal surfaced. “We’ve got a real desire to win and do it for a long time.”

The 30-year-old Bogaerts was one of the headliners in a stellar group of free-agent shortstops that also included Turner, Carlos Correa and Dansby Swanson.

Bogaerts, who’s from Aruba, terminated his $120 million, six-year contract with Boston after the season. The four-time All-Star forfeited salaries of $20 million for each of the next three years after hitting .307 with 15 homers and 73 RBIs in 150 games.

Bogaerts is a .292 hitter with 156 homers and 683 RBIs in 10 big league seasons – all with Boston. He helped the Red Sox win the World Series in 2013 and 2018.

Bogaerts becomes the latest veteran hitter to depart Boston after the Red Sox traded Mookie Betts to the Los Angeles Dodgers in February 2020. Rafael Devers has one more year of arbitration eligibility before he can hit the market.

Bogaerts had his best big league season in 2019, batting .309 with a career-best 33 homers and 117 RBIs. He had 23 homers and 103 RBIs in 2018.

In 44 postseason games, Bogaerts is a .231 hitter with five homers and 16 RBIs.