The Yankees should ditch their dumb grooming policy

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There is some chattering going on about Yankees outfield prospect Clint Frazier. It’s not trade chatter. It’s not chatter about how quickly he’ll make it to the big leagues. It’s chatter about his hair.

It’s red and curly and, for most of his time in baseball, it has been long. It was long and flowing and crazy when he was with the Indians, but he got it cut after coming to the Yankees in the Andrew Miller trade last summer. Now, however, it is long again, as you can see in the above photo.

That’s not terribly long but as the New York Times reminds us, when you play for the Yankees, you’re ordered to wear a haircut you can set your watch to:

But with the Yankees, Frazier’s hair has brought unwelcome attention. In short, the Yankees do not do big hair (or beards), under a policy set years ago by George Steinbrenner and vigorously policed by his daughter Jennifer. Now there is a guessing game over whether the team will send Frazier to the barber before sending him to the plate.

The talk now is whether or not — or when — Frazier will be forced to cut his hair.

A lot of you will just nod and say, hey, this is Yankee Tradition and it’s part of their image so Frazier should cut his damn hair. And I appreciate that sentiment to some degree. While I come off as a radical about a lot of things, I do believe that balancing tradition and modernity is important and it doesn’t always come down to “new = better!” This is especially true in baseball, which is more bound up with tradition than most pursuits, and for which I would never argue chucking tradition just for the sake of doing so.

But it’s worth looking at why this is Yankee Tradition. It’s worth looking at why the Yankees, in the year 2017, continue to police players’ grooming habits like this.  I mean, it’s not as if baseball players need short hair to play well. Recent history has shown us otherwise. And it’s not as if Yankees players being clean cut and short-haired is some absolute moral good handed down by God Almighty (word on the street is that His son had long hair, after all). Rather, the impetus for the policy was the era in which it was imposed and the social and political leanings of the guy who imposed it.

George Steinbrenner bought the Yankees in 1973. This was at a time when long hair had been in fashion among civilians for several years, but was just beginning to filter into baseball. While Richard Nixon and the Silent Majority couldn’t do anything about the way the hippies wore their hair, Steinbrenner could certainly do something about his players. Whether he hated the hippies or just worried that Yankees fans did and wouldn’t come to the ballpark to see them, his imposition of the short hair rule was an unmistakable reactionary response to the world changing in a way a rich businessman from Cleveland didn’t like. Or, at the very least, to what he worried his customers wouldn’t like.

While one can argue that such a statement was reasonable in 1973, it’s hard to see why it still holds in 2017. But not just because a lot of time has passed. Rather, because the very purpose of the long hair ban — a perceived need to react to allegedly threatening hippies — has passed. Maybe it’d be a different case if the grooming policy had its roots a hundred years back. Maybe if Miller Huggins had established it with reference to some sort of 1920s neo-classical idea about What Makes Men Virtuous or something. That may have been silly too, but at least then someone could argue about it being an aspirational thing that had long been part and parcel of the Yankee Tradition as a whole.

But as it is, the policy’s sole motivation is tied up in reactionary fear of change. What kind of tradition is that? It’s actually kind of pathetic, especially given how, whatever you think of the hippies, The Establishment has clearly won by every possible metric short of personal grooming.

Anyway, like I said: balancing tradition and new ideas is always important. But when the tradition is based on something dumb it has no real argument to recommend it. Such is the case with the Yankees haircut rules. They should be chucked. Let Clint Frazier and every other Yankee fly his freak flag as high as they’d like.

Biden praises Braves’ ‘unstoppable, joyful run’ to 2021 win

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WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden said the Atlanta Braves will be “forever known as the upset kings of October” for their improbable 2021 World Series win, as he welcomed the team to the White House for a victory celebration.

Biden called the Braves’ drive an “unstoppable, joyful run.” The team got its White House visit in with just over a week left before the 2022 regular season wraps up and the Major League Baseball playoffs begin again. The Braves trail the New York Mets by 1.5 games in the National League East but have clinched a wildcard spot for the MLB playoffs that begin Oct. 7. Chief Executive Officer Terry McGuirk said he hoped they’d be back to the White House again soon.

In August 2021, the Braves were a mess, playing barely at .500. But then they started winning. And they kept it up, taking the World Series in six games over the Houston Astros.

Biden called their performance of “history’s greatest turnarounds.”

“This team has literally been part of American history for over 150 years,” said Biden. “But none of it came easy … people counting you out. Heck, I know something about being counted out.”

Players lined up on risers behind Biden, grinning and waving to the crowd, but the player most discussed was one who hasn’t been on the team in nearly 50 years and who died last year: Hall of Famer Hank Aaron.

Hammerin’ Hank was the home run king for 33 years, dethroning Babe Ruth with a shot to left field on April 8, 1974. He was one of the most famous players for Atlanta and in baseball history, a clear-eyed chronicler of the hardships thrown his way – from the poverty and segregation of his Alabama youth to the racist threats he faced during his pursuit of one of America’s most hallowed records. He died in January at 86.

“This is team is defined by the courage of Hank Aaron,” Biden said.

McGuirk said Aaron, who held front office positions with the team and was one of Major League Baseball’s few Black executives, was watching over them.

“He’d have been there every step of the way with us if he was here,” McGuirk added.

The president often honors major league and some college sports champions with a White House ceremony, typically a nonpartisan affair in which the commander in chief pays tribute to the champs’ prowess, poses for photos and comes away with a team jersey.

Those visits were highly charged in the previous administration. Many athletes took issue with President Donald Trump’s policies and rhetoric on policing, immigration and more. Trump, for his part, didn’t take kindly to criticism from athletes or their on-field expressions of political opinions.

Under Biden, the tradition appears to be back. He’s hosted the NBA champion Milwaukee Bucks and Super Bowl champion Tampa Bay Buccaneers at the White House. On Monday he joked about first lady Jill Biden’s Philadelphia allegiances.

“Like every Philly fan, she’s convinced she knows more about everything in sports than anybody else,” he said. He added that he couldn’t be too nice to the Atlanta team because it had just beaten the Phillies the previous night in extra innings.

Press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre was later questioned about the team’s name, particularly as other professional sports teams have moved away from names – like the Cleveland Indians, now the Guardians, and the Washington Redskins, now the Commanders – following years of complaints from Native American groups over the images and symbols.

She said it was important for the country to have the conversation. “And Native American and Indigenous voices – they should be at the center of this conversation,” she said.

Biden supported MLB’s decision to pull the 2021 All-Star Game from Atlanta to protest Georgia’s sweeping new voting law, which critics contend is too restrictive.