A federal judge unsealed evidence in Cardinals-Astros hacking scandal

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A report from David Barron and Jake Kaplan of the Houston Chronicle revealed new details about former Cardinals scouting director Carlos Correa‘s hacking of the Astros’ computer databases from 2013-2014. On Thursday, federal judge Lynn Hughes unsealed three documents pertaining to Correa’s offenses. While certain parts of the documents remain redacted, Barron and Kaplan believe they could give Major League Baseball enough information to issue a punishment for the Cardinals prior to the start of the 2017 season.

The documents revealed that Correa obtained access to to the Astros’ “Ground Control” database 48 times and accessed the accounts of five Astros employees, using passwords from GM Jeff Luhnow, analyst Colin Wyers and three unidentified minor league players in the Astros’ system. Among other offenses, Correa also had “unfettered access” to the email account of director of decision sciences Sig Mejdal for 2 1/2 years.

After hacking into the system, Correa accessed the Astros’ list of preferred selections for the 2013 amateur draft, as well as confidential medical records, trade notes, and numerous scouting reports for players the Cardinals later drafted.

According to assistant U.S. attorney Michael Chu, Correa might also have been behind the Deadspin leak in 2015:

Chu also disclosed in the sentencing report his belief that “it must have been Correa” who leaked confidential Astros information to Deadspin.com concerning 10 months of Astros confidential trade discussions after also posting details to Anonabin.com and Pastebin.com, two bulletin boards that allow anonymous posting of data.

As a result of the Deadspin leak, the prosecutor wrote, “general managers through Major League Baseball were forced to awkwardly reassure their players. … Ultimately, the Astros were forced to issue private apologies to every team in the league. It was a humiliating episode for the Astros.

The documents can be read in full here. Based on the details revealed in the reports, Barron and Kaplan estimate that MLB officials could impose a sanction against the Cardinals as soon as this week.